Food & Drink in Brentwood

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Loard’s Ice Cream beguiles ice cream connoisseurs with more than 40 flavors of cold culinary comfort. Experience the tastes of fall without sautéing leaf piles by slurping up regular-sized scoops of pumpkin or maple-walnut ice cream crafted with cream from local suppliers ($2.50 each). Popular concoctions such as cookie-dough, bubble-gum, and ube-taro-root ice cream color tongues’ opinions on nothing-but-dessert diets, swaying them to beg for milkshakes for breakfast ($3.85), double scoops for lunch ($3.85), and kids’-sized scoops for post-cardio workouts ($1.90). The punch cards unlock further treasures of Loard’s loaded menu, including ice-cream-free italian sodas, shaved ices, and freshly made cookies.

7760 Brentwood Blvd
Brentwood,
CA
US

Al Courchesne, affectionately known as "Farmer Al," planted his first peach orchard in 1976. In the years that followed, he learned the best ways to grow all sorts of other foods too, including apples, plums, and most anything else that can sprout in Californian soil. Eventually, Al started Frog Hollow Farm, producing steady harvests for more than 20 years as a certified organic farmer with a focus on sustainable practices.

Frog Hollow's success likely lies in Al's fine-tuned growing process. As harvest nears, Al and his staff purposely underwater the trees. They also leave every piece of fruit on the branch until it's completely ripened. The process results in a heavily concentrated flavor, which has garnered much attention from national publications, including the New York Times, Better Homes and Gardens, O Magazine, and Cooking Light Magazine.

Farmer Al keeps all 133 acres of his farm in constant operation. Therefore, the farm is generally closed off to the public except for occasional special events. Locals, however, have plenty of opportunities to taste the seasonal harvests without secretly stowing away inside incoming shipments of fertilizer. They can buy the fruit at Frog Hollow Farm Market inside of the Ferry Building or get it shipped directly to their home via the farm’s delivery program. Otherwise, they can head to the farm kitchen, where chef Becky Courchesne uses it in turnovers, cookies, and other goods. The farm also sends blemished, but useable produce to their Community Supported Agriculture Program.

11435 Brentwood Blvd
Brentwood,
CA
US

Brentwood Dog House is not the place to go for burgers or ribs. They serve one thing, and one thing only: encased meats. All-beef hot dogs come in two sizes, regular and colossal, and can be dressed up with specialty toppings, such as jalapeños, sauerkraut, and cheddar cheese. All dogs, even chicken and turkey dogs, come with onions, relish, mustard, and ketchup, save for the Chicago-style dog, which includes an anti-ketchup force field.

234-B Oak Street
Brentwood,
CA
US

There's nothing small about Lumpy's Diner Express. It's not just that its eight-page menu is stocked with a variety of burgers, hot dogs, and other diner favorites—it's that it features several "Big Appetite" challenges, including one that requires diners to devour a burger that weighs more than 4 pounds and is loaded with at least six different toppings.

Lest its diners think that Lumpy's only features heavy meals, it offers healthy choices such as low-fat bison patties, grilled chicken, and protein shots for the milkshakes. An array of theme nights—such as Car and Bike night Mondays—and Betsy Ross look-alike contests round out Lumpy's all-American vibe.

7760 Brentwood Blvd
Brentwood,
CA
US

The Smiths don't have a family tree. Instead, their legacy stretches back through a long vine, all the way to the heirloom tomato farmers of Spain. In the 1970s, Janice, Ken, Bill, and Shirley Smith opened Smith Family Farm to carry on that legacy. Their staff has since grown to include cousins, other relatives, and family friends, all of whom lend a hand in growing the farm's seasonal produce. The literal fruits of their labor arrive at The Smith Family Farm Fruit Stand, which showcases a rotating selection of fresh basil, strawberries, peppers (both hot and sweet), and various other fruits and veggies.

The farm itself also welcomes visitors. Throughout the growing season, its gardens invite families to pick their own fresh fruits and vegetables, including plums, apricots, and squash. The farmers themselves double as educators, and their spring tours for elementary and preschool-aged children lift the curtain on farm life—which, of course, includes opportunities to dance along to bluegrass music.

4400 Sellers Ave
Brentwood,
CA
US

Brentwood Scene