Sightseeing in British Columbia

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Rustic wood cabins interconnected by wooden walkways stand amid a network of fountains, mountain streams, and small waterfalls. Dense forest and blooms of emerald ferns spread out in all directions. The train whistle and drum beats echo through the trees. At Klahowya Village in Stanley Park, natural scenery opens up to authentic representations of British Columbia's First Nations and Métis cultures through its attractions, performances, and artisan marketplace. As guests arrive, knowledgeable First Nations guides in native dress usher guests into the park, where they can start by taking in the sights or boarding the miniature covered Spirit Catcher train for storytelling journeys past forest tableaus.

Young dancers and actors in traditional dress stage cultural performances every Friday through Sunday throughout the summer, and coffee by Spirit Bear Coffee Company keeps visitors warm year-round. In the indoor marketplace, First Nations and Métis artisans proffer pieces of handmade visual art, jewellery, apparel, and other crafts. The nonprofit Aboriginal Tourism Association of British Columbia operates the park as part of its aim to create a sustainable and educational showcase of Aboriginal culture for visitors and local residents.

610 Pipeline Road
Vancouver,
BC
CA

Honeybee Centre buzzes with professional apiarists and busy hives, which work together to support Surrey's agriculture and inform the next generation of beekeepers. Most of the staff's time is spent renting out hives to pollinate fruit crops, then harvesting the resulting honey⎯whether from blueberry, cherry, or pumpkin plants⎯to sell in their store. The insect experts also provide an extermination alternative by removing and relocating pesky colonies of bees and wasps.

Additionally, the centre devotes significant resources to education, whether through kid-friendly exhibits or basic to advanced beekeeping courses, which help students manage their own hives and join in the bees' ritual dances. In the Bees & Bugs lab, kids of all ages tackle hands-on educational activities and watch live bees and other bugs. Afterwards, visitors can relax in the centre's Tea Hive Café, noshing on cookies or pie while sipping locally roasted coffee in a greenhouse.

7480 176 St
Surrey,
BC
CA

Iconic buildings rise up on either side of tour groups as they trail guides who regale them with stories and historical insights. Traversing a total of 12 Victoria and Vancouver neighbourhoods, the Architectural Institute of British Columbia’s walking tours illuminate pivotal and noteworthy structures throughout the city. In Victoria, explorers can ramble through Chinatown—the oldest Chinatown in the nation—or feel the waterfront breeze while taking in the splendor of the Parliament buildings. Alternatively, Vancouver walkers can embed themselves in the city’s first neighbourhood, Strathcona, or investigate industrial expansion by roaming Yaletown.

The AIBC, established in 1920, is a self-governing body dedicated to excellence in the profession of architecture for the benefit of the public, its membership and the environment.

800 Yates St.
Victoria,
BC
CA

For Andra Holzapfel, taking visitors on tours of Harrison Hot Springs Resort and its surrounding area is a way to meld her passion for history with her love community. That's why she founded Harrison Heritage Walking Tours—to fulfill her goal of helping others get excited about the history that so inspired her. Tours spend 90 minutes wending their way through the streets Harrison Hot Springs and along the shore, while Andra offers up legendary tales and fun facts about the area's history in relation to the Gold Rush, Sasquatch, and the natural hot springs that give the resort its name.

22-1700 Mackay Crescent
Agassiz,
BC
CA

Whistler Eco Tours, rated Whistler’s top attraction by users of 10Best, reintroduces Mother Nature to her neighbours in Whistler with several tours of terrain traversing and topography tracing. Today's deal lets you choose one from the following three guided tours:

4220 Gate Way Dr
Whistler,
BC
CA

Dev and Joanne McIntyre first began to experiment with winemaking after moving to the Mt. Lehman area in 1984. They tended to their small backyard vineyard and carefully tracked how different grapes grew and developed in the region's distinctive climate. After sharing these data and collaborating with fellow viticulturalists, Dev and Jo narrowed the list of possibilities down to a few specific varietals, which they felt could ripen evenly along the relatively cool and precipitation-prone coastline.

When they purchased Salt Spring Vineyards in 2008, they set about growing some of these grapes, also opting to fashion pleasantly sweet wines from organic apples and locally grown blackberries. Although their very first experiments occasionally had to be recycled as wine vinegars, grape jellies, or aperitifs for pampered houseplants, they continued to hone their craft with each and every harvest. Currently, the selection boasts a range of styles, including a crisp, dry pinot gris and an unctuous cabernet libre that balances its dark fruit flavours with firm tannins. As a demonstration of their commitment to the environment, Dev and Jo also adhere to sustainable growing practices and avoid using any herbicides or pesticides in their fields.

151 Lee Rd
Salt Spring Island,
BC
CA