Italian Restaurants in Brooklyn Park

Select Local Merchants

Put yourself over the moon with today's Groupon to Pazza Luna. For $15, you get $35 worth of al dente pastas, succulent seafood, delectable meats, and more at the romantic Locust Point bistro. Lean over the table for intimate whispers and calamari nibbles, seated discreetly in a private corner of this buzzing yet cozy locale. Dine on the sensual Mediterranean cuisine that makes young lovers starry-eyed and sneaks up on long-established couples like a big pizza pie of amour. Welling was determined to capture the minds and tongues of the niche—but expanding—market of disco fans. After extensive research, he determined that disco’s sparkling clothing and bouncy rhythms were the culinary equivalent of pasta covered in rich tomato sauce. Welling’s findings were so delicious that disco changed its name to Italy, enraging Italy, which was forced to change its name to Lapland, Home of Full-Blooded Italians. Pick up today’s Groupon for some delicious Italian food from America, prepared by full-blooded Italians from Lapland, Home of Full-Blooded Italians.

1401 E Clement St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Taverna Corvino's seasoned chef uses nothing but the freshest and most authentic Old World ingredients to put together a menu of pastas, paninis, and hoagies for lunch and dinner. Begin the evening with a trio of fried risotto balls lightly coated in three cheeses and served with dipping sauce ($6), or the spicy jumbo prawns sautéed in garlic, butter, white wine, and chile flakes ($11). Taverna Corvino boasts a variety of homemade pastas, so feel free to sample a few among the table, such as three-cheese baked macaroni topped with pancetta ($13) or the MD crab ravioli stuffed with sweet lump crab and blended cheeses and topped with olive pesto ($16). Or fill your belly to the brim with flatbread pizzas featuring ingredients like fresh spinach, eggplant, albino anchovies, sweet Italian sausage, or shaved pecorino ($8 for a pizza with two toppings, extra ingredients $0.50–$1 each).

1117 S Charles St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Ciao Bella Salon's savvy stylists treat unruly head fur in their comfortable studio, replete with shiny wood-toned floors and walls colored in warm hues. Clients can iron out frizzy hair with a keratin replenishing treatment, in which tiny keratin irons work to flatten curly hair to a silky smooth texture. Or infuse brown, black, or neon yellow into your golden follicles with a full foil and color treatment. Ciao Bella Salon’s expert staff will listen intently to your description of the ideal haircut while giving confident advice as to how to achieve such a flawless hairdo. And since it’s just a short jaunt from neighborhood eateries and antique shops, Ciao Bella Salon makes for a convenient stop on the way to a romantic date or in the midst of a shopping trip to purchase a Latvian submarine. Customers must call ahead to schedule their appointments.

236 S High St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Upholding the time-honored tradition of the cucina, Mamma's crafts a menu of warming Italian fare in a casual and welcoming atmosphere. Savor simple seafood starters such as the fried calamari ($7.99) or mussels marinara ($6.99) before moving mouths to more elaborate entrees. Mamma's veal sorrentina snuggles a fresh cut of veal with prosciutto, eggplant, and mozzarella cheese ($17.99), and the shrimp fradiavolo’s spicy marinara ($15.99) livens up palates and deters milquetoast dates from sampling. Catering to those who prefer circular fare, head chef Eduardo Boteo and his team prepare Mamma's panoply of pizzas topped with fresh ingredients. Weekly dinner and lunch specials are also available for those looking beyond Cucina's core collection.

1020 W 41st St
Baltimore,
MD
US

Recently owned by a mother-daughter team, this inviting eatery cocoons patrons' outers with lively Sicilian murals while swaddling their inners with authentic Italian fare. Dinner diners dig delights such as the eggplant parmigianna, its tasty titular ingredients layered along with marinara, mozzarella, and linguine, giving it the personality potency of a multifaceted opera warbler ($15.95). Flavorful meat, vegetarian, and fresh seafood dishes abound, as well as wine, beer, specialty drinks, and frothy coffee beverages flown in directly from Sicilian java dairies.

410 S High St
Baltimore,
MD
US

In a warm family home in Calabria, Italy, young Aldo Vitale grew up amidst artisans and apprenticed in his father’s woodworking shop. Though he developed a craftsman’s skills, he was more deeply influenced by the family’s kitchen, which, true to Italian tradition, was the axis on which the entire house revolved. Upon emigrating to the US in 1961, Vitale enlisted in the army only to end up bounced right back to Italy, this time stationed around Florence and Siena in Tuscany. Heeding his homeland’s obvious role in his destiny, he honed his culinary skills there before returning to Baltimore, where he refined his style in local kitchens before opening Aldo’s Ristorante Italiano.

With a Tuscan wine cellar, crimson-hued library, and airy main dining area tucked inside the shell of two converted brownstones, Aldo’s opulent decor has since earned effusive press acclaim. The New York Times tells patrons they can “expect to be treated like royalty” in the “oh-so-grand atrium dining room,” and _USA Today recommends it for “special occasions, when you want to dress up.” The restaurant’s splendor also bears a personal touch—drawing from his woodworking ancestry, chef Vitale himself carved each piece of elaborate woodwork on display, including the mahogany bar.

Chef Vitale’s background also emerges in his balanced Southern Italian cuisine, which prioritizes subtle harmonies of bold, simple flavors. Local and organic ingredients shine on a menu that evolves regularly to incorporate seasonal truffles and myriad housemade products, helping Aldo’s earn spots on Baltimore magazine’s 2010 and 2012 Best Restaurants lists. Cold antipasto plates draw from a climate-controlled artisanal cheese cave on the premises, and housemade sausage pairs with fresh orecchiette pasta and parmigiano reggiano. For meaty main courses, chefs grill double-cut Prime Wisconsin veal chops as well as prime filet mignon, which they pair with seared foie gras and wild mushrooms.

To ensure an apt pairing with each dish, Chef Vitale stocks his redwood wine cellars with thousands of bottles carefully curated from a blend of prominent wineries and obscure small-batch producers. The resulting wine list comes annotated with tasting notes, Wine Spectator-numerical ratings, and helpful servers that happily recommend or improvise musical numbers about any given bottle.

306 S High St
Baltimore,
MD
US