Dive Bars in Brooklyn


Select Local Merchants

  • Pete's Candy Store
    Inhabiting a former sweet shop, Pete's Candy Store unveils a whimsical seasonal menu of eclectic cocktails and gourmet sandwiches amid free nightly live music and other bustling bar activities. On Sundays, revelers can gobble up a roasted turkey, cheddar, and spicy aioli sandwich ($8) during open-mic (5 p.m.–8 p.m.), and then enjoy the indie-folk sounds of The Go Round (8:30 p.m. in March) while trying to keep the Dragonfly Punch cocktail ($10) from winging around the heads of other bar patrons. On any day of the week, an artichoke heart, brie, and onion-relish ciabatta sandwich ($8) pairs well with a Bleeding Heart cocktail, made with Akvavit, Cherry Heering, and lyrics from Celine Dion ballads ($10).
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    709 Lorimer St
    Brooklyn, NY US
  • Alligator Lounge
    Whether you are looking for a slice of pizza or a whole pizza pie, Brooklyn's Alligator Lounge offers a wide variety of pizza types and sizes. Put the diet on pause when you visit Alligator Lounge — there are no low-fat menu items. For your viewing pleasure, Alligator Lounge also stocks TVs in the bar area. Ideal for birthday parties or other large get-togethers, Alligator Lounge has all the room you'll need to be comfortable. Between the music and the crowds, be prepared for a lot of noise at this pizzeria. Weekend visitors to the pizzeria are well advised to take advantage of the reservation system — crowds tend to pack the place on Fridays and Saturdays. Street parking is provided for those dining at the pizzeria's Metropolitan Ave location. If public transportation is preferable, ditch the car and board nearby stops at Lorimer St. (L), Metropolitan Ave. (G), and Graham Ave. (L). Prices are downright affordable at Alligator Lounge, with most items well under the $15 mark.
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    600 Metropolitan Ave
    Brooklyn, NY US
  • Welcome to the Johnsons
    Munch on tasty pub grub at Welcome to the Johnsons. Plan to indulge a bit at Welcome to the Johnsons, though, because they don't offer any low-fat fare. Complement you meal with a beer or wine from Welcome to the Johnsons delightful drink menu. Take advantage of great beer and tasty bites when you stop by for happy hour. Guests may have a hard time conversing, as the restaurant is rather noisy. Welcome to the Johnsons can fill to capacity on Fridays and Saturdays, and with their no-reservation policy, you may need to wait a bit for your table. Wear what you like when you dine at Welcome to the Johnsons — the restaurant has a chill vibe just right for casual dining. Welcome to the Johnsons patrons can pull into a space on the street when searching for parking at the Rivington St location. Need a break from the road? Public transportation is also convenient, with popular stops at Delancey St. (F), Essex St. (J, M, Z), and 2 Ave. (F). Thrifty eaters will also love Welcome to the Johnsons' prices, which are generally below $15.
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    123 Rivington St
    New York, NY US
  • Bar None
    Enjoy a large array of finger food at Bar None, a local pub. The menu doesn't include any low-fat items, so set aside some extra calories for your visit. Unwind with a glass of wine or cocktail with your meal — Bar None has a wonderful selection of drinks to accompany your dinner. Unwind on a budget, and enjoy happy hour's low-cost beers and simple eats. If you have a large group out celebrating a birthday, anniversary, or other milestone, Bar None is a great pick for large parties with its spacious layout. Get down with a live DJ while dining and have some fun on the restaurant dance floor. Loud is an understatement when it comes to the decibel levels at this restaurant, so it's best to save conversation for another location. It tends to get especially busy on weekends, so be sure to call ahead and make a reservation. Keep it casual at Bar None — the restaurant is laid-back and patrons dress accordingly. Bar None patrons can find street parking at the 3rd Ave location. If you're too tired to drive, public transportation will also suffice; right around the corner are stops at 3 Ave. (L), 14 St. - Union Sq (4, 5, 6, 6X), and Union Sq - 14 St. (L). Menu items at Bar None tend to be mid-priced, so expect to plop down about $30 per person to dine here. Major credit cards — including Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express — are accepted.
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    98 3rd Ave
    New York, NY US
  • Brother Jimmy's BBQ
    Chow down on ribs, slaw and more at Brother Jimmy's BBQ, a down-home barbecue joint in New York. Low-fat eaters will need to take care, however, since the menu does not feature any skimmed down fare. Never miss a play with TVs broadcasting the biggest games in the bar area. Brother Jimmy's BBQ is kid-friendly, so little ones are welcome to tag along. Big family? Tons of friends? Bring 'em all to Brother Jimmy's BBQ — the bar has an awesome layout for large parties and groups. For a low cost, you can connect through the bar's wifi. Be sure to check out Brother Jimmy's BBQ's outdoor seating when the climate is right. The bar's noise level can be somewhat straining on the vocal cords, so intimate get-togethers may be best enjoyed elsewhere. People tend to swarm the bar on Fridays and Saturdays, so be sure to reserve space for your party ahead of time. It doesn't get much more laid-back than Brother Jimmy's BBQ, so dress for comfort when you come. Throwing a big party? Count on Brother Jimmy's BBQ to provide top-notch catering with the same great dishes you love. Parking spaces are available curbside near the bar. Hop on public transit if driving's not your speed; accessible stops include 79 St. (1, 2), 86 St. (1, 2), and 81 St. - Museum Of Natural History (A, B, C). Dining at Brother Jimmy's BBQ will set you back about $30 per person on average.
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    428 Amsterdam Ave
    New York, NY US
  • McSorley's Old Ale House
    In 1854, just three years after he landed in New York, Irishman John McSorley opened a blue-collar saloon that served ale along with cheese and crackers. He probably never foresaw the legends who would walk through the swinging front doors, or that his saloon would become a landmark associated with literature, art, music, and even civil rights. In the more than 150-year history of McSorley’s Old Ale House, its sawdust-strewn floors were tread on by figures such as Abraham Lincoln, John Lennon, and Woody Guthrie. e.e. cummings visited and wrote the poem “i was sitting in mcsorley’s”, and artist John French Sloan created several paintings depicting the saloon. Even a play inspired by McSorley’s ran on Broadway for more than 100 performances. Two attorneys led a suit to allow women into the ale house, taking the case all the way to the Supreme Court. And amid this flurry of activity, the saloon survived multiple changes to the brewer of its McSorley’s Cream Stock Ale, including during Prohibition when Bill McSorley had to set up a brewery in the basement. Though ownership has changed three times, each owner has honored the original spirit of McSorley’s. This remains true today as the Maher family continues to run the place as a true ale house. Behind the bar still looms the words of John McSorley embossed on a hardwood cabinet: “Be good or be gone.”
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    15 East 7th Street
    New York, NY US
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