Groceries & Markets in Brooklyn

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Owner and brine master Alan Kaufman reignites the tradition of classic barrel pickling by curing a variety of pickled fare in casks without preservatives, soaking the snacks for up to six months before dishing them out by the quart, half gallon, or gallon. More than 30 types of brine-soaked morsels line the shelves, including the classic new pickles, sour pickles, and hot new pickles (all $6.25/qt.). Other vinegar-soaked veggies run the gamut from sliced hot peppers ($10/qt.) to marinated mushrooms ($14.50/qt.), remedying sodium deficiencies and the architectural instability of the food pyramid. Pickle Guys also jars seasonal creations, such as pickled pineapple ($11.50/qt.).

1364 Coney Island Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Shelsky's Smoked Fish’s kitchen crew preserves time-honored traditions as it crafts updated takes on Jewish smoked fish and meats, earning a feature in the Brooklyn Paper and Serious Eats. Owner Pete Shelsky combines fish cured in-house with authentic fare sourced offsite, including pickles from Guss', bagels and bialys from Kossar's, and deep-fried Russian literature from Tolstoy’s. Patrons can peruse the shop's stock of Jewish fish and dairy products, also referred to as appetizing, which include house-cured gravlax ($11.99/quarter lb.) and hot-smoked Door County whitefish ($19.95/lb.). Guests can also expand on traditional horizons with the house-cured clementine- and ginger-cured salmon ($11.99/quarter lb.), which the South Brooklyn Post reports was inspired by Shelsky's two daughters, Clementine and Ginger. Patrons can also opt to carry out stacked sandwiches, such as the traditional lox-and-bagel Member of the Tribe ($9) or the Brooklyn Transplant ($11), which layers kippered salmon, apple horseradish, and pickled-herring salad between pumpernickel bread for a culinary construction more appealing to the tongue than a bridge made out of popsicles.

251 Smith St
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Food is something most people need sooner or later for general aliveness and energy for riding Ferris wheels. For $15, today's Groupon gets you $35 worth of natural and organic groceries from Fresh Fanatic. This 7,000- square-foot boutique grocery store in Fort Greene/Clinton Hill specializes in fresh everything. You’ll find fully prepared dishes, spices, and international cheeses on the wood shelves and coolly lit cold cases around the store.Follow @Groupon_Says on Twitter.

275 Park Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

If the sight of house-cured sausages hanging in the window of Emily's Pork Store doesn't draw you in, the smell certainly will. Passerby can catch whiffs of roasted red pepper and basil, which might clue them in to the fact that this shop not only sells sausages, but also makes them from scratch. Every other week, owner Jerry Aliperti and staff spend hours creating up to 60 pounds of house charcuterie, from hot and sweet Italian sausages to the house-favorite, broccoli rabe sausage.

Though sausages have been the shop's mainstay for 40 years, they also import many foodstuffs from Italy to help round out meals. On the shelves, guests can find Italian dried pastas in a range of shapes, and hard Italian cheeses, which Aliperti can gladly tell you how to prepare or hide from ravenous housemates.

426 Graham Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Board-certified eyelid surgeon Dr. Irene Gladstein heads ENHANCE Aesthetic Arts, a haven of anti-aging treatments of both the surgical and nonsurgical varieties. Brow lifts and lid lifts correct tired, drooping features, enhancing visages and revealing a more youthful look. Meanwhile, for aesthetic issues located below the neckline, Dr. Gladstein also offers laser-hair removal along with Venus Freeze body contouring treatments which target cellulite.

2076 E 13th St.
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Red Hook Lobster Pound

Over a plate of fresh Maine lobster that they brought back to the city themselves, husband-and-wife duo Ralph Gorham and Susan Povich wondered aloud, “Why doesn’t someone in New York start a fresh-seafood business?” Their destiny as restaurateurs was realized the moment those words were uttered: they opened Red Hook Lobster Pound a mere six months later. Gorham began traveling to Maine every weekend, scoping out catches and making deals with fisherman, choosing only those that partook in environmentally sustainable practices. Meanwhile, Povich experimented with recipes in order to add to an already lengthy repertoire of lobster-based recipes she learned while growing up in the Northeast. Word of mouth helped spark interest in their eatery, and before long, the demand compelled them to expand their storefront to include a picnic-style dining room. They’ve even added a food truck––nicknamed "Big Red"––that brings lobster-based dishes to diners across the city. According to The New York Times, success has had little effect on Red Hook Lobster Pound’s menu: “It tastes as fresh as can be, which matters when you’re dealing with a trend that’s growing so fast.” Their lobster rolls—served on split-top buns and garnished with just enough homemade mayo—have been lauded by Zagat, Bloomberg News, and Gourmet.com. Other popular dishes include lobster bisque, lobster mac-n-cheese, and a lobster dinner, served with homemade coleslaw, potato salad, and fresh, lake-caught corn.

284 Van Brunt Street
Brooklyn,
NY
US