Things To Do In Brownwood

Select Local Merchants

Fair but challenging seems to be the ethos of course architect Bill Johnston and The Hideout Golf Club, the 18-hole, 6,981-yard grassy gem sculpted into the scenic area surrounding Lake Brownwood. The par 72 flows through a circuit of wide fairways that let players liberally use their driver. Though treacherously placed, The Hideout’s sandtraps are also fair—most will reward a sound bunker shot. But while golfers will appreciate the player-friendly features, they shouldn’t take the course lightly. Ravines and water hazards come into play on multiple holes, and the course plays to a formidable 74.1 rating from the tips. To make the club even more hospitable, The Hideout has a dynamic practice facility with a 5,000 square-foot practice green and a full-length driving range, where golfers can practice hitting with every club and mastodon fossil in their bag.

Course at a Glance:

  • 18-hole, par-72 course designed by Bill Johnston
  • Length of 6,981 from the farthest tees
  • Course rating of 74.1 from the farthest tees
  • Slope rating of 139 from the farthest tees
  • Four tee options
  • Scorecard
2632 Farm to Market Road 45
Brownwood,
TX
US

Though the creatures on display at Dinosaur World don’t need much space to roam, plenty of care has been taken to furnish them a comfortable habitat. They peer imposingly from the hillsides of Kentucky, crane their necks up through native trees, and stomp through prairie fields. Although a life-size mammoth or T. rex might be hard to miss, little visitors might still jump with delight at noticing a baby dino suddenly appear from behind a bush. Giant brachiosaurus necks arch high above treetops, while toothy meat-eaters and spiny stegosauruses roam the world below. The fiberglass, steel, and concrete models reach up to 80 feet in length, and are built according to the latest scientific discoveries about what dinosaurs looked like and what styles were trendy in the Mesozoic era.

The first Dinosaur World location was a former alligator farm in Florida and five years later another one was opened in Kentucky. As Swedish-born Christer Svensson began to fill it with statues, he consulted with experts around the world to not only create realistic reptiles but to surround them with fun, educational activities. Kids can sift through sand to find shark’s teeth, gastropod shells, and trilobites in a fossil dig, get to know some lizards a little better on the playground, or examine ancient eggs and raptor claws in the museum.

1058 Park Road 59
Glen Rose,
TX
US

In 1885, behind the counter of Wade Morrison's Old Corner Drug Store on the corner of Six Shooter Junction in Waco, Texas, pharmacist Charles Adlerton was struck by an idea. After observing how much patrons loved the combined scent of the many ingredients hidden within the soda fountain, he decided to create a drink that captured all their properties. He wound up inventing Dr. Pepper, and after one sip, Dublin Bottling Works owner Sam Houston Prim knew he wanted to sell it. Though the famous drink and plant have since parted ways, Dublin Bottling Works continues to celebrate that original legacy by crafting pure-cane-sugar sodas in chilled glass bottles, the way their employees have for more than 100 years.

Today, the bottlers' products find their way onto shelves all around the nation, and they invite visitors to come watch them while they work. They lead tours through their historic plant and the memorabilia-laden museum that now occupies their original offices. At the end of the tour, they make a stop in Old Doc's Soda Shop, where visitors can sample their products from an old fashioned soda fountain and buy bottled goods to drink at home or shake vigorously and then offer to neighbors who keep eating your newspapers.

105 E Elm St
Dublin,
TX
US