Symphony in Carbondale

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Hershey Theatre

The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.

1400 Market Street
St. Louis,
MO
US

Ornate chandeliers and a high-ceilinged auditorium are just two stunning features of Powell Hall, an opulent, Versailles-inspired concert venue built in 1925. Originally known as the Saint Louis Theatre, Powell Hall was bequeathed its new moniker after the Saint Louis Symphony Society won it during a heated card game with a band of ragtag vaudeville performers. With its marble-accented lobby and sprawling interior, Powell Hall continues to beckon visitors to take in its inimitable sights and classic sounds.

718 N Grand Blvd
Saint Louis,
MO
US

When Victory Theatre opened in 1921 as part of the Main Street Hotel Sonntag complex, the denizens of Evansville were fed a daily diet of high-class vaudeville: a silent movie, comedy skit, organ music, and then a 10-piece orchestra. In 1928, that dependable formula changed when ?talking? pictures arrived, and the venue remained a Loews movie theater until 1971. Having survived a late ?70s stint as a teen-oriented nightclub and a site for Partridge Family reunions, the Victory emerged triumphant after an extensive 1999 renovation. Now with room for 1,900 audience members, the entertainment mecca hosts top-tier musical and comedic touring acts and plays home to the Evansville Philharmonic Orchestra.

600 Main St
Evansville,
IN
US