Pets in Carpentersville

Select Local Merchants

With its cozy decor and absence of ominous cages, The Dog Waggin’s welcoming facility gives busy pet owners peace of mind as their pups comfortably socialize and play. The 4,000-square-foot digs house a play room with pooch playground equipment—including slides and tunnels—a relaxing play room—characterized by fluffy pet beds—and a backyard, where dogs can caper about or stretch out and bronze their bods in time for swimsuit season. Pups are free to rest and play as they see fit with their fellow boarders, all under staff supervision during daytime outings and overnight stays. The canine caretakers also offer a number of other services, including walking, in-home sitting, and training from owner and certified dog trainer Lisa Harvey.

1400 S Main St
Algonquin,
IL
US

We are an in home pet sitting, dog walking company that provides services for Crystal Lake Illinois and surrounding areas.

4715 Strong Road
Crystal Lake,
IL
US

Land mines, poop piles, dog logs—no matter what the euphemism, Poop 911 allows families to circumvent one of the unappealing parts of dog ownership. It'll clear entire yards of dog waste, and even can apply repellent to deter pets from destroying a treasured flower bed or magic beanstalk. Other add-ons include raking leaves and dog walking.

10 North Martingale Road
Schaumburg,
IL
US

AnimalSense began in 1999 with a set mission to help dog owners live peacefully with their dogs, by using training methods backed by the steady hand of science. Classes only ever teach dog-friendly methods of positive reinforcement, a pleasant, pain-free experience for dog and owner alike. Class sizes are limited to allow for one-on-one instruction. The variety of classes available makes enrollment in the program sensible for beginners and previously trained dogs alike. Classes include options for dogs of mostly all temperaments, from a session for shy dogs, to Intro to Agility for fledgling performance hounds. This Groupon is not valid for special aggression classes such as Doggone Issues.

1945 South Plum Grove Road
Palatine,
IL
US

When a widespread skunk infestation effecting Chicago suburbs made national headlines, media outlets such as USA Today, NPR, the Chicago Sun-Times, and WLS 890AM with John and Lauren hailed ABC Humane Wildlife Control & Prevention as the front lines of humane defense. Since its founding by university-trained naturalist Garon Fyffe in 1976, the team of animal experts has deftly removed unwanted animals, pests, and birds from homes and businesses. Each of the 35 state-licensed wildlife control experts employs humane processes to sniff out pest problems and solve the underlying issues, such as gaps in the foundation, tree limbs offering easy roof access, or handbills lying around offering employment in return for cheese.

1418 E Olive St
Arlington Heights,
IL
US

Horse Tack: Geared Up for a Ride

Most basic riding lessons include a how-to on tacking up the horse. Get a head start with Groupon's overview of horse tack.

Tack refers to everything a horse wears for a ride, from saddles to bridles to reins. Just as people dress differently for different jobs, horses wear different tack depending on whether they're employed riding on trails, working on a cattle ranch, strutting down a runway, or competing inside a show ring.

One of the most important pieces of tack is the saddle, buckled onto a band around the horse's middle called a girth. Western saddles, designed for long days of riding, distribute the rider?s weight evenly and comfortably across the horse?s back. At the front is a horn around which cowboys can wrap rope used to lead cattle. English saddles, on the other hand, are hornless, and are light to give horses more freedom to run and jump.

Then there are the parts of the tack designed to help the rider communicate with the horse. The bridle?leather headgear that slips around the horse?s ears and nose?is attached to a bit and reins. The bit is a metal or synthetic bar attached to the bridle and resting in the back of the horse?s mouth on its gums. The reins connect to the bit, letting the rider tug gently to indicate the need to slow down or make a turn. Although the reins used in English and Western riding may be the same, they're used differently. English riders hold on with both hands, whereas Western riders hold both in just one hand, leaving the other free to high-five passing sheriffs.

7713 E Tryon Grove Rd
Richmond,
IL
US