Kids Activities in Charleston

Select Local Merchants

Since its founding by Marion Reid in 1969—and through its adoption by current owners Michelle and David Folden—Stono River Riding Academy has helped riders connect with temperate steeds and with their natural surroundings on 360 acres of trees and pastures. During classes and leisurely rides, trainers lead mounted explorers through the labyrinthine passageways of Johns Island, passing beneath billowing drapes of Spanish moss and escaping the cacophony of urban areas. Stono River’s staff always keeps safety in mind, ensuring that pupils wear proper equipment and familiarize themselves with all the confusing controls on the horses' dashboards.

2962 Hut Rd.
Johns Island,
SC
US

Charleston Waterkeeper conducts four primary programs to gather data on Charleston’s waterways in order to protect the health and vitality of the water for the entire community. Water Quality and Stormwater Monitoring programs gather empirical information to identify and resolve water-pollution issues from sewage and storm-water runoff. The Permit Watchdog program researches permits and discharge-monitoring reports to prevent unlawful discharges, and the Patrol program helps keep the rivers clean and free of pollution by maintaining a physical presence on the water. Charleston Waterkeeper recently became a member of the Waterkeeper Alliance, a movement of 200 organizations that patrol and protect more than 100,000 miles of rivers, streams, and coastlines across the globe.

Vendue Range & Concord St
Charleston,
SC
US

“Sisters in sweat” Mary and Mandy approach fitness with a philosophy of cooperation. They believe that when one works out in pairs or groups, they are more willing to push themselves harder because they will, in a sense, be succeeding for those motivating them. Together, Mary and Mandy captain boot camps and fitness classes designed for women and men of all fitness levels, including beginners, parents, and mothers-to-be.

2364 Daniel Island Dr.
Charleston,
SC
US

Drayton Hall

When John Drayton broke ground on Drayton Hall in 1738, he had no idea that his estate would survive the American Revolution, the Civil War, an earthquake, and numerous hurricanes. The stories contained in the building?s walls span seven generations of history tied to the Draytons and the Bowens family, an African American family that lived and worked at Drayton Hall before and after emancipation. Since 1974, when Charles and Frank Drayton sold their ancestral home to the National Trust, visitors have been able to transport themselves into the past with more ease than rubbing the beard at the Lincoln Memorial.

The main house, a sweeping example of Georgian Palladian architecture, is the oldest near-original, unrestored colonial home in the United States. Like a helpful ghost, the grand rooms and original fireplaces whisper history into the ears of all visitors, telling tales of British and colonial soldiers who occupied the house during the American Revolution. Views from the portico are filled with drooping trees, spanish moss, and a grand driveway. Surrounding the estate, an undisturbed historic landscape backs up to the Ashley River, and also encompasses A Sacred Place, the oldest African American cemetery in the country still in use.

3380 Ashley River Rd
Charleston,
SC
US

When the Charleston Museum was founded in 1773, South Carolina was still a British colony. Today, the museum is itself a historical gem, surviving both the American Revolution and Civil War and acquiring an astounding collection of South Carolinian artifacts along the way. Nine permanent exhibits include the Armory, brimming with antique weaponry, and the Lowcountry History Hall, which chronicles the land's metamorphosis from a tribal society into an agricultural empire, telling the story with early trading goods, slave badges, and pottery. Temporary exhibits change regularly, keeping visitors on their toes in the same way changing cell phone numbers every 24 hours does.

The museum extends its history-preserving mission to two area homes: the 19th-century Joseph Manigault House, once home to a wealthy rice plantation owner, and the Heyward-Washington House, where George Washington once stayed during a weeklong visit to the city. Restored rooms, period pieces, and loudly snoring grandfather clocks await guests during scheduled tours.

360 Meeting St
Charleston,
SC
US

It started small: in 1931, Lieutenant Commander Charles Russell Price directed a series of one-act plays at the Charleston Navy Yard. The series was an unexpected success, and a year later, his band of amateur theater-makers had evolved into an

20 Queen St
Charleston,
SC
US