Galleries in Belmont

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Sisters and native Charlotteans Neha Negandhi and Monika Shah didn?t let respective stints in Seattle and Alaska keep them away from their hometown arts scene. Inspired by similar BYOB painting sessions seen during their travels, they harnessed their diverse experiences with event management and Alaskan train tours to open their own studio, where they encourage students of all artistic levels to tap into their inimitable creativity just as they did. Joined by an impressive cast of local artists, the sisters unfurl a calendar stocked with a barrage of painting options, allowing students to portray a sailboat with an impressionistic mast or a seahorse wearing a gilded saddle.

1308 The Plaza
Charlotte,
NC
US

Though admission is always free, the Contemporaries-level membership provides invitations to special events and parties and includes discounts on ticketed events. Housed in a historic church, the McColl provides feast after ocular feast. ZipStir, a current exhibition, features installations by Hong Seon Jang and Jonathan Brilliant. Jang's work displays the connectivity of the world using US zip codes and plastic zip ties, and Brilliant crafts patterns out of consumer materials such as coffee stirrers.

721 N Tryon St
Charlotte,
NC
US

Beetle Queen Conquers Tokyo, directed by Jessica Orek, is an independent documentary that has garnered praise from IFC, Variety, and Filmmaker magazine for its quiet, poetic imagery, offbeat subject matter, and avant-garde style that, as critic Alicia Van Couvering stated, is "so much more than the sum of its parts." The film explores Japan's fascination with insects, the country's lucrative trade of insect sales, insect art and literature, and more, all through the magnifying lens of historical detective work. The Duke Energy Theatre offers an intimate, attractive space for film-gazing, with auditorium-style seats that keep your vision clear from obstructive bonnets, beehives, and Gorgon snakes.

345 N College St
Charlotte,
NC
US

The Mint Museum has amassed an impressive collection, including American, ancient and Native American, contemporary, and decorative art, since opening in 1936. With a one-year membership to the Mint Museum, Charlotteans get unlimited free admission to the Mint Museum, a 10% discount in the museum shops on purchases exceeding $10, reciprocal privileges at participating regional museums, invitations to special events, discounts at select area retailers, membership eligibility for the museum's affiliate groups, and invitations to art-related trips. Besides the oodles of opportunities, your softball stats will improve thanks to the eagle-eyed vision you'll hone through the careful study of hues and brushstrokes.

500 S Tryon St
Charlotte,
NC
US

Founded in 1974 as the Afro-American Cultural Center, the Harvey B. Gantt Center for African-American Arts+Culture stands as an evolving tribute to the Africans and African Americans who have contributed to American culture. Among this group is prolific architect and museum namesake Harvey B. Gantt, who has worked tirelessly to create an equal-opportunity "New South City."

  • Size: 46,500 square feet of paintings, sculptures, films, performance art, and music
  • Eye Catcher: the central glass atrium, where stairs and escalators at both ends form an allusion to Jacob's Ladder and the ideal of advancement through education
  • Permanent Mainstay: The John and Vivian Hewitt Collection of African-American Art, which includes 58 works from 20 artists, on display through January 19, 2015, then removed for temporary rest
  • The Building: the exterior design was inspired by the quilts of the Underground Railroad era as well as woven textile patterns from West Africa
  • Pro Tip: photography is only allowed in the Grand Lobby, the Performance Suite, and the Rooftop Terrace
  • While You're in the Neighborhood: check out the other attractions that make up the greater Levine Center for the Arts
551 S Tryon St.
Charlotte,
NC
US

Linda Minor, a member of the North Carolina Society of Goldsmiths and a former fashion buyer for J.C. Penney and Belk department stores, sells handmade creations within Bead Me’s spacious shop. Her first designed jewelry, which has been recognized as American-made by Martha Stewart, was chosen to be given to First Lady Michelle Obama on behalf of the city of Charlotte, NC. She draws from her style expertise to create necklaces, earrings, and bracelets with pearls, coral, turquoise, Swarovski crystals, and semiprecious gemstones. Many of her pieces incorporate copper, an antimicrobial metal that resists fading. During fun, BYOB jewelry-making classes, Linda imparts her beading know-how to students of all skill levels, giving them hands-on practice with metal-manipulation techniques such as fold forming and reverse psychology.

301 E Tremont Ave
Charlotte,
NC
US