Things To Do In Chelsea

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There are no words to describe this beautiful farm- you just have to come check it out! With over fifty students, we have something for everyone. Students range in age from five to seventy-five and all enjoy the lessons from our three wonderful trainers, all while relaxing on this 50+ acre farm.

6491 Highway 51
Wilsonville,
AL
US

Hidden Hills Equestrian Center's owner and trainer, Stephanie Howard Gingles, shares her equine-related wisdom with casual and competitive riders during horse-riding lessons, which cover English-, hunter-, and jumper-style riding techniques and horse-care methods. Hidden Hills Equestrian Center's owner and trainer, Stephanie Howard Gingles, shares her equine-related wisdom with casual and competitive riders during horse-riding lessons, which cover English-, hunter-, and jumper-style riding techniques and horse-care methods. The facility’s lush, emerald expanses and white fences reserve a spacious area for advanced lessons in jumping and horse showing. Students can borrow one of Hidden Hills’ horses for riding lessons and fast-food runs, or can bring along their own steeds. Horse owners can also find adequate lodgings for their four-legged companions in Hidden Hills’ boarding stalls, which include grooming, feeding, and blanketing services.

6745 Highway 55
Wilsonville,
AL
US

Along Stepping Stone Farm's 130 acres of pastures and tree-studded hills, owner Courtney Huguley provides opportunities for students to hone horsemanship skills and connect with natural surroundings. During lessons, Courtney and assistant instructor Elizabeth Stevenson teach students the basics of saddleseat riding, a traditional English style from which many other methods have originated, including jousting with swimming noodles. Once students gain comfort and confidence during private lessons, the instructors introduce them to group lessons with up to four other riders to master walking, trotting, and synchronized neighing.

Weeklong summer camps are also available for younger riders. During these sessions, each camper is assigned to one specific horse, learning responsibility and companionship.

1154 Griffin Rd
Chelsea,
AL
US

280 feet per second. That's the speed limit at Central Alabama Paintball. Although some paintball guns are capable of catapulting pellets at much higher speeds, staff here check each gun's speed to ensure a safe, fun, and comfortable experience for every player. They also require that everyone use the field's own paintballs, specially formatted to splatter at lower impacts—without staining clothes, which is especially helpful at paintball weddings.

Refs at Central Alabama Paintball are paid professionals who brief every player on rules and equipment operation. To ensure fair play, they also group paintballers by skill level. The staging area's sound system announces whether each game is for beginner, intermediate, or advanced players, and solo players can join a team matched to their ability level.

With safety firmly in place, the fun can begin. The round starts, and paintballs soar over one of five outdoor fields with obstacles such as wooden spools and giant inflatables, or the full mock-town field. It's common to see birthday parties, family reunions, and other celebrations darting around the field. In addition to amenities such as a large covered deck, a grill and fire pit, and setups for cornhole and horseshoes, the field boasts lower-impact guns suitable for players as young as age 6.

100 Metro Parkway
Pelham,
AL
US

Literature, music, and food come together at Taste of Pelham, an annual fundraising event that benefits Pelham Library Guild. Shelby's, Cozumel Grill, and more than two dozen other local restaurants will serve up samples that—according to Pelham Library Guild president Debbie Parrott—add up to the equivalent of a five-course meal for each guest. Lauded authors and celebrities such as MasterChef winner Whitney Miller will be in attendance, and a local jazz band sets the auditory ambiance. Pelham Library Guild plans to use the funds from the event to build a new library for the community.

500 Amphitheater Road
Pelham,
AL
US

They tell a tale to quake your bones at Warehouse 31—on October 13, 1875, a woodcutter by the name of Billy Turner killed his nine-year-old daughter in a horrific accident. Unable to cope with his grief, Turner killed himself. But the pain was too great for death to assuage. Soon Pelham was under siege from a series of mysterious events. A young girl found roaming unattended along a railway. The sound of a chainsaw echoing from the forest. Glass doors sliding open as soon as somebody stepped in front of them. Today, Warehouse 31 stands on the site of that ill-fated lumberyard, and guests can experience some scares of their own, thanks to a cast of monsters, high-tech animatronics, and gravely unhinged clowns.

3050 Lee Street
Pelham,
AL
US