Seafood Restaurants in Fulton River District


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  • Carnivale
    Carnivale: A User's Guide Pan-Latin cuisine and cocktails served in a frenetic, wildly colorful space and accompanied by energetic Latin music. Sample Menu Cocktail: one of the famed mojitos Cold starter: chunky guacamole Hot starter: ropa vieja with sweet plantains and queso fresco Entree: steak arrachera served with bacon sofrito and chimichurri Where to Sit: A spot near the grand central staircase provides prime views of all the action without drowning out your tablemates' conversation. When to Go: Stop in on a Wednesday or Thursday evening, when live Latin music lures diners to the dance floor. While You're Waiting Try to estimate how many tomato plants could fit on Carnivale's roof. (Chef Rodolfo Cuadros also grows ghost peppers, cumin, and lettuce up there.) Even if you're not imbibing, spend some time with the drink menu—you'll come away with a basic education in tequila, cachaca, and rum. Vocab Lesson Ropa vieja: Spanish for "old clothes," this dish is much more tender than its name suggests. It's made by simmering shredded flank steak in a piquant tomato broth. Caipirinha: a Brazilian cocktail made with the sugar-cane-based spirit cachaca and lime. While You're in the Neighborhood Before: Learn some steps for the dance floor with a class at Latin Rhythms Academy of Dance & Performance (210 N. Racine). After: Keep the clubby vibe going by heading over to the Mid (306 N. Halsted Street), a venue known for hosting some of the city's hottest DJs. If You Can't Go, Try: A similar mix of upscale Latin eats, drinks, and dancing reigns at Nacional 27 (325 W. Huron Street).
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    702 West Fulton Market
    Chicago, IL US
  • Wâfel
    Waffles might be their only offering, but Wâfel is anything but a formal restaurant. Instead, it's a counter-service café, serving steamy beverages from its full coffee bar and selling virtually nothing that requires a knife and fork to eat. Instead, each of their waffles are "fold and go"; that is, sandwiched firmly around their ingredients so every selection only requires two hands to devour. The waffle artisans craft sweet and savory sandwiches from traditional Brussels waffles, which are leavened with yeast for a puffier, airier consistency than the standard American waffle. The recipe might be traditional, but what fills these sandwiches is anything but—selections run the gamut from scrambled eggs, bacon, and cheddar to fried chicken and maple syrup to The Elvis, a blend of bacon, peanut butter, banana, and honey. For a more dessert-like treat, try a Liège waffle. This style, also puffed up with yeast, is thicker and doughier than its Brussels brethren, and contains imported Belgian pearl sugar that caramelizes on the waffle iron to form a crispy exterior that contrasts with the soft interior, much like a sunbathing marshmallow Peep. These waffles are delicious on their own, or dipped in a rotating menu of sauces such as apple-cinnamon cream cheese, jam, and––of course––Belgian chocolate.
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    217 North Clinton Street
    Chicago, IL US
  • Blackbird
    Traditional American cuisine combines with an avant garde attitude at Blackbird. There are no low-fat options here, though, so save a few extra calories for your next visit. You'll find a wonderful selection of drinks from Blackbird's full bar to top off your meal. Little ones are just as welcome as their parents at Blackbird. Blackbird easily accommodates large groups — there's even a reserved room available for those extra special occasions. Bask in the sun (or moon!) light when you dine on Blackbird's outdoor patio. Don't get stuck waiting for a table — the restaurant accepts reservations. Feed the gang at your next get-together with catering from Blackbird as well. Street parking is easy to find near the restaurant. Or, if you don't want to circle the block, valet parking is also available. Hop on public transit if driving's not your speed; Clinton-Green (Green, Pink) is an accessible stop. Prices are a bit on the higher side, so this might be a good pick for a special night out.
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    619 W Randolph St
    Chicago, IL US
  • Girl and the Goat
    There's no way around it: the pig face at Girl & The Goat is exactly what it sounds like. The unusual pork dish has helped Chef Stephanie Izard’s Girl & The Goat become one of Chicago's most raved about restaurants. In her short time in the spotlight, the James Beard Award–winning executive chef has become something of an industry star, emerging as the season-four champion of Bravo's Top Chef. She's gritty, and her dishes reflect that, perhaps none more than the pig face. This signature dish starts with—what else?—the head of a pig. Once they clean, prep, and season the meat to perfection, they roll it into a cheesecloth and braise it in pork stock for 12 hours. This isn’t just any pork stock, though. The restaurant has used this same batch since opening, bringing it to a boil daily to make sure it's safe to consume. After removing it from the aged stock, chefs slice the porchetta-style roll into patties. They then cook those patties in the wood-fired oven until crispy, and crown them with crunchy potato sticks and an oozy sunny-side up egg. The result: a medley of different textures, topped off with a sweet maple gastrique and a tart tamarind vinaigrette that add even more layers of flavor."
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    809 W Randolph St
    Chicago, IL US
  • Maude's Liquor Bar
    To many, the idea of French cuisine inspires images of stuffy maître 'ds and three-figure bottles of burgundy. Those people might be surprised to stumble upon Maude's Liquor Bar, which Brendan Sodikoff—the gastronomic mastermind behind Gilt Bar—designed to embody "a dive bar in Paris," according to Chicago Magazine. In its second floor digs, mismatched chandeliers cast a low glow over salvaged subway tiles and exposed brick walls as diners savor a contemporary French-American menu that its creators describe as “straightforward and sexy with playful twinges.” Though the food is more than worth the wait on weekend nights, the drink list is where Maude’s truly shines. Classic cocktails, such as the Sazerac and the St. Germain Fizz, mingle with unique libations such as the Smash, a drink brimming with mint leaves, citrus wedges, and a choice of spirits ranging from whiskey to chartreuse. Of course, no French dive would be complete without a wine selection, and Maude's list of about 30 reds, whites, and champagnes doesn't disappoint.
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    840 West Randolph Street
    Chicago, IL US
  • Harold's Chicken
    When entrepreneur Harold Pierce opened the first Harold’s Chicken Shack on Chicago’s South Side in 1950, his chefs fried chicken as it was ordered, filling customers' empty hands with baskets of fresh, piping-hot chicken in 12–15 minutes. Today, the chain of 62 restaurants peppered across the Midwest and Southwest continues the old tradition of rewarding patience with astonishingly delicious chicken. The long-standing shop specializes in a simple order—breaded chicken fried in a rich mix of vegetable oil and beef tallow for a home-cooked flavor. Chefs prep the chicken Chicago style by pouring a dash of sauce over the basket, which soaks into the white bread and crinkle fries that come with every order. Marked with the famed emblem of a cook chasing a chicken with a hatchet, the restaurant has saturated the city’s consciousness, earning a mention in Tucker Max’s I Hope They Serve Beer in Hell, an appearance in Kanye West’s music video Through the Wire, and its own chicken hologram projected over the skyline. Serious Eats sums up citywide sentiment for the chain: "When the words 'fried chicken' are uttered in Chicago, it’s a fair bet that the name Harold’s Chicken Shack will usually follow."
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    804 W Washington Blvd.
    Chicago, IL US

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