Vegetarian Restaurants in Fulton River District

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Carole Jones had been accustomed to eating a diet of rich, processed foods all her life. But when she lost her husband to cancer, she felt that if she continued to treat her body in the same way, her life too would be cut short. This inspired her to seek out new ways of living, which in turn led to her discovery of the raw-food diet. After switching her eating habits to organic, raw fruits and vegetables, she shed 50 pounds and began to feel better. She soon found a kindred spirit in Polly Gaza, a health aficionado who had also lost loved ones to cancer, and together they opened Raw to help others change the way they eat. Here, the chefs convert organic ingredients into a menu of fully uncooked dishes, eschewing processed foods and emphasizing high levels of nutrients. They whip up plates of mediterranean falafel, collard burritos, and the Sprouted Living salad alongside raw versions of comfort foods, such as garden burgers and spaghetti with meatballs. Helpings of tuna pâte smear onto bavarian sunflower bread, which guests can wash down with fresh smoothies and juices, including wheatgrass juice and Raw’s signature grapefruit spirulina. An expansive list of uncooked desserts awaits to cap off meals, offering bites of silky orange truffles, raw granola, and tiramisu.

131 North Clinton Street
Chicago,
IL
US

Though the chefs at Thai Urban Kitchen draw from the flavors of Thailand and Japan's street food, they aren't afraid to add in more upscale ingredients. To wit, they use gourmet cuts of meat and vegetarian alternatives to make unique twists of classical cuisine. In infusing a little something extra to their signature pad thai, they add cuts of duck, calamari, beef, and shrimp with just a touch of red apple for sweetness. On their sushi menu, chefs design creative rolls such as the Salmon Lover, which combines raw salmon, masago, and avocado with spicy mayo, all topped with pink nori and seared salmon. And to end the meal on a sweet note without having to whittle the check out of chocolate, the chefs also scoop Asian-inspired flavors of ice cream as well as 18 gelatos.

Juxtaposing with the colorful sushi rolls and eye-catching plating is the dining room's sleek decor. A monochromatic design scheme adds a touch of modernity that is not impervious to comfort thanks to high-backed leather seats. Silver metalwork and treated glass hang above the expansive bar, where bartenders pour sake by the glass or offer their favorite selections in drink flights.

500 W Madison St
Chicago,
IL
US

Though Joel Nickson and his brothers didn’t open the first Wishbone until 1990, the restaurant’s history actually dates back to World War I. Their grandfather, an American soldier, met their grandmother in France, and convinced her to come back to rural North Carolina with him. Once in America, she began to experiment in the kitchen, applying French techniques to ingredients she could find locally. In that simple desire to adapt, she unknowingly designed an approach to food that would be carried through her family's next two generations. After Joel was born, his family eventually relocated to New Jersey, but he carried a torch for the French-Southern meals he grew up on. At 15 he took a job at a soul food restaurant, and went on to apprentice at famed New York City establishments 21 Club and Quo Vadis. He then followed his roots back to North Carolina, becoming the head chef at a resort there before getting an invitation from his brothers in Chicago: they wanted him to help them open their own restaurant. He agreed. Naturally, the project became a family affair. The brothers and a sister-in-law helped build the space with their own hands. Once it was ready, their mother, Lia, covered the walls with her surrealist, farm-inspired oil paintings. They started out serving breakfast and lunch in a style they call Southern Reconstruction, which integrates everything their family had tasted or prepared in France, North Carolina, New York, and Chicago—with an extra bit of Creole spice. As the Nicksons supplied larger and larger crowds, they decided to start serving dinner as well. Today, the eatery has grown into two locations with equally expansive menus; beneath fried-egg light fixtures, diners can start their day with buckwheat pancakes or shrimp and grits, and dig into dinners such as blackened catfish or NC-style pulled pork, sometimes served by Joel’s own children.

1001 West Washington Boulevard
Chicago,
IL
US

Published author and raw-food advocate Karyn Calabrese has spent decades educating people on the benefits of an uncooked but flavorful diet free of meat, fish, chicken, or dairy products. In a recent interview for the Chicago Tribune, Calabrese traced her culinary interests back to Sundays in the kitchen with her grandmother. After watching family members succumb to degenerative diseases, she was inspired to tread a different nutritional path. Calabrese has shared her vegan and vegetarian cooking techniques in numerous media, including CBS and ABC news. Four restaurants currently bear her name, vegan philosophy, and commitment to organic foods: Fresh Corner and Garden Cafe, Fresh Corner and Raw Bistro, Cooked, and On Green. The café and market offer eco-conscious shoppers a range of products, and Karyn's Inner Beauty Center provides holistic therapies such as acupuncture and individualized wellness coaching programs. The center's spa services employ natural products, some of which arrive directly from the kitchen or straight from the fields via teleportation chamber. Convenient take-home meals and a variety of events such as yoga classes and lessons in "uncooking" help patrons maintain a healthy lifestyle.

130 South Green Street
Chicago,
IL
US

Baba's Village banishes weekday hunger pangs with a full menu of Indian and Pakistani cuisine that includes vegetarian and vegan options alongside entrees made with halal chicken, lamb, and beef. The vegetarian meals, which can pair with six naan side dishes baked in a clay oven, include polychromatic platters of vegetables and herbs, and many selections feature house-made cheese made from pasteurized moon rocks. With soy milk shakes and entrees containing meat substitutes, such as chicken jalferazi and gobi goshat, Baba's Village easily accommodates vegan appetites.

310 S Canal St
Chicago,
IL
US

It’s a wonder the staffers at Protein Bar have time to do anything but smile for the camera amid the maelstrom of media attention the eatery has received in recent years. The man at the center of the storm is founder Matt Matros, dubbed one of Crain’s Chicago Business’s most successful 40 Under 40 in 2012. Matros spend his youth struggling with his weight, and lost his father to a heart attack before his 22nd birthday. The shock sparked a renewed hunger for life in the young executive, who went on to shed 50 pounds through exercise and healthy eating. Along the way, Matt noticed a gaping hole in the world of fast food—where were the healthy options? He decided to throw his corporate career to the wind and pour his entire life savings into opening the first Protein Bar, a welcoming haven for the health-conscious eater. Matros’ business soon flourished into eight Chicago locations, with three more in D.C. His aim was to cut out the junk that pervades fast-food chains—refined sugars, hydrogenated oils, empty calories, and unsettling cartoon characters—and replace it with lean protein, heart-healthy fiber, and satisfying flavor. The menu accomplishes just that. At breakfast, bowls are filled with oatmeal deemed some of the finest in the city by CBS Chicago. As the hours wear on, a special mix of six types of veggies builds each salad into a powerhouse of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. Bar-ritos swap out calorie-heavy rice for quinoa and flour tortillas for hearty whole-wheat wraps. Signature blended drinks omit sugary additives for protein mixes and fruit, each named for a Chicago neighborhood, and bowls of warm, organic quinoa come topped with protein and fresh produce.

352 N Clark St
Chicago,
IL
US

Fulton River District Scene