Nightlife in Old Irving Park

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McNamara’s acquaints guests with the culinary traditions of Ireland by crafting hearty pub cuisine, steak, and seafood dishes within a traditional Irish atmosphere. Familiar cuts of beef and salmon rest alongside edible archetypes of Irish culture, such as juicy flanks of corned beef, savory shepherd’s pie, and sculptures of James Joyce made entirely from mashed potatoes. During morning hours, diners revel in traditional Irish breakfasts and modern brunch favorites amid the corner tavern’s eight HD televisions or upon the umbrella-studded patio.

4328 W Irving Park Rd
Chicago,
IL
US

The number 13 has gotten a bad rap through the years, but the Pineda clan is attempting to turn that around. Thirteen members of the Pineda family run Thirteen Asian Tapas + Bar, with four crafting meals in the kitchen while Gary Pineda leads the pack as general manager. All of their recipes are sourced from Filipino culinary traditions, themselves a fusion of Asian and Latin influences, as evidenced by dishes such as soy-sauce-infused adobo chicken and the roasted and fried lechon, or pork, topped with achara, a traditional pickled papaya garnish.

The kitchen calls on overseas recipes in selections such as pancit, a traditional Filipino birthday dish comprised of thin rice noodles sautéed with cabbage, carrots, and meat that diners unwrap to reveal a miniature band of singing party guests. On some nights, live jazz fills the intimate dining room, where purple walls and exposed brick surround a bar that begets nine specialty martinis that mirror the cuisine's manifold influences with flavors of ginger, mint, tequila, and imported Philippine gin.

4202 W Irving Park Rd
Chicago,
IL
US

After launching in early 2011 with just two beers on its menu, Finch's Beer Company has expanded into a full craft brewery. At the Chicago-based facility, seasoned brewmasters blend high-quality ingredients, such as American hops and flavored malts, into a core lineup of five beers. These include the Fascist Pig, a dry-hopped American red ale brewed with caramel malts, the Threadless IPA, a hoppy concoction devised in collaboration with the local design company, and the formidable Secret Stache Stout, which is a subtly sweet fusion of vanilla beans and chocolate malt. Though they're available in cans at bars throughout the city, these brews also flow freely on regularly scheduled brewery tours. Each guided visit introduces guests to the equipment and brewing process, including the part where the brewers milk the hops from the pink elephants.

4565 N Elston Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

At Paddy Mac's, chefs revel in gastropub traditions by sizzling up a bounty of Irish-inspired bar staples. In the dining area, servers adorn high-top tables with dishes of potato skins, corned-beef sandwiches, and a signature burger that Centerstage_called "a half-pound of perfection" as patrons cheer for local teams or affable corporate mascots on eight HDTVs overhead. A slew of Irish beers and microbrews complement the pub grub, while an outdoor patio and a full brunch menu encourage guests to celebrate the sunshine.

4157 N Pulaski Rd
Chicago,
IL
US

Each member of the duo behind Lake Effect Brewing Company has a similar story, as both developed a new appreciation for handcrafted beers while traveling through Europe. With their respective beer passions ignited, Clint Bautz and Lynn Ford embarked on their journeys as homebrewers. Their hobby gained momentum faster than a cheetah driving a Formula 1 car, so much so that it outgrew its brewing space. So, the two joined forces as Lake Effect Brewing Company. The result is a roster of handcrafted beers, many of which are inspired by the European styles they first tried abroad.


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In an interview with the Guide, Lake Effect Brewing Company's owner and founder, Clint Bautz, talks about the brewery's "insanely hopped" Falcon Dive IPA, its local ingredients, and how it stands out from the brewery's other creations.

4727 West Montrose Avenue
Chicago,
IL
US

Most theaters in the 1920s were built to showcase vaudeville acts. The Portage Theater, however, was ahead of its time by focusing on film. The silver screen remained its specialty through 2001, when it closed due to dwindling audiences and countless actors leaving Hollywood to pursue animal husbandry. After extensive renovations, it reopened in 2006, this time to showcase a variety of performances?from movies to concerts to special events?and even star in one of its own: it was prominently featured in the mob-era film, Public Enemies.

4050 N Milwaukee Ave
Chicago,
IL
US

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