Brazilian Steakhouses in Cimarron Hills

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At Fogo de Chao, a behemoth Brazilian churrascaria in the heart of LoDo, skewer-wielding, Gaucho-costumed servers in puffy black pants saunter from table to table, tempting carnivores with more than a dozen different meats – think filet mignon, top sirloin, sausage, salted ribeye and mint-marinated lamb – that are carved tableside and plucked off the skewers with tiny tongs. And the meat just keeps on coming and coming until you flip your coaster to red, which indicates that your belly needs a break from the gluttony. Luckily, there’s an impressive salad bar, too – but like the meat parade, it’s hardly pedestrian: imported cheeses, breads, hearts of palm and marinated vegetables, including artichokes, stock the display, which is replenished long before anything has vanished. With its comfortable seating and elegant touches, Fogo de Chao is perfect for a special occasion, or just a meat-frenzied evening with friends.

1513 Wynkoop St
Denver,
CO
US

With nods from USA Today, CBS News, and The Washington Post, Rodizio Grill has made a name for itself as an authentic Brazilian charrascuria?a South American?style rotisserie. Founded by S?o Paolo?born Ivan Utrera, the cuisine comprises of select cuts of meat, which are slow-roasted on a spit and then skewered. It also features fish, grilled pineapple, and unlimited trips to an award-winning salad bar with over 40 items. Gauchos?also known as Brazilian cowboys?bustle about the restaurant, bringing unlimited slices of tender meat to diners who can also grab fresh vegetables and homemade salads at the gourmet salad bar, as well as enjoy Brazilian appetizers served directly to the table.

1801 Wynkoop St.
Denver,
CO
US

Brazil?s flag hangs proudly under the front counter at Little Brazil. The flag??vibrant green, yellow, and blue??reveals the eatery?s menu: flavorful and authentic Brazilian food. Chefs simmer pots full of black beans, smoked sausage, pork sirloin, bacon, and Brazilian dried beef. They blanket chicken cutlets in a sauce crafted from cream, garlic, tomatoes, onions, and mustard. The chefs? sweet and savory pastries??with such fillings as chicken and Brazilian cream cheese, or cinnamon and banana??are deep-fried or shellacked at patrons? request.

8020 Federal Blvd
Westminster,
CO
US

Joseph Freyre first wandered into a kitchen more than a quarter-century ago, and since then, he hasn't quite managed to leave. He studied traditional techniques at Del Webb Culinary Institute; served a 15-year stint as maitre d' at a five-star, five-diamond hotel; and owned and operated multiple restaurants. He started Joseph's Fine Dining as a simple combination of his love for fine cuisine and the art of tableside preparation, or flambéing.

He's concocted a lot of signature creations over the years, but chief among them stands the pepper-steak flambé, marinated in mango chutney and cast ablaze in French brandy. He follows up his fiery dinners with equally flame-kissed desserts including classics such as bananas foster and cherries jubilee.

1606 S 8th St
Colorado Springs,
CO
US

Texas T-Bone Steakhouse brings the larger-than-life culture of Texas northward, offering big portions and family-style dining in a casual atmosphere. The servers start by delivering a bucket of peanuts to the table, and etiquette dictates that diners throw their cracked shells on the ground. The practice may leave a bit of a mess, but it provides both entertainment and an appetizer as chefs work on preparing the entrees. This might entail grilling 28-ounce porterhouse steaks?a cut of meat they officially refer to as "Texas-sized"?or barbecuing meats over hickory and apple wood for up to 14 hours in their smokers. The restaurant serves every entree with a "create your own" salad, fresh-baked yeast rolls, and a dollop of cinnamon honey butter that's great for spreading on bread or on a classified document you have to eat after reading.

5245 N Academy Blvd
Colorado Springs,
CO
US

With a name as focused as J&J?s House of Prime Rib, it's no surprise that the namesake entree is featured prominently on the menu. In 10-ounce, 15-ounce, and 20-ounce cuts, the tender, marbled meat is slow-roasted until it practically melts on the tongue. Such unwavering dedication to technique extends to the rest of the menu, too. Misoyaki-glazed salmon shows off the chefs' versatility, as do

Alaskan king crab legs with chili-garlic beurre blanc. But the spirit of simple, uncomplicated elegance is truly the restaurant's hallmark, and is reflected in its decor as well. Rich woodwork and slate-hued stone accents fill the space, lending a warmth that is complemented by banquettes in autumn hues and earthenware tile floors.

16990 Village Center Dr. E
Parker,
CO
US