Kids Activities in Avondale


Select Local Merchants

During a self-proclaimed midlife crisis, Tod Swormstedt became the voice for some silent witnesses to American history: signs. The former editor and publisher of Signs of the Times magazine was more than familiar with the subject, and he wanted to give this particular slice of Americana a permanent tribute. He opened American Sign Museum in 1999 and filled it with nearly 4,000 books, photos, and, of course, lots and lots of signs. Size: more than 19,000 sq. ft. of exhibit space (with 20,000 more on the way), featuring 28-foot ceilings for larger signs Eye Catcher: a glowing McDonald's sign from 1963?six years before NASA landed a cheeseburger on the moon Permanent Mainstay: the neon and hand-painted signs of Main Street, which recreates storefronts from decades past Hidden Gem: the grizzly-looking sign from bygone supermarket chain Big Bear?which someone discovered while mowing grass Don't Miss: the neon shop, open weekdays, where workers create new signs and chat with visitors From the Press: For a glance inside the museum, check out the many video interviews here.
2515 Essex Pl
Cincinnati,
OH
US
The Cincinnati Chamber Orchestra showcases music not commonly performed by large symphony orchestras, so each show is an uncommon musical experience. During Spring 2, the delicately constructed harmonies of Arnold Schoenberg and George Gershwin (two works each) float across Corbett Auditorium and into ears to tickle auditory nerves like pixies riding tiny ponies on eardrums. Two of the four pieces were inspired by literature. Schoenberg’s Transfigured Night was inspired by a Richard Dehmel poem about a shocking confession that affects two lovers, while Gershwin's Porgy and Bess Suite is inspired by DuBose Heyward’s racially charged 1925 novel about the inhabitants of the semi-fictional Catfish Row. Schoenberg's Five Pieces for Orchestra, op. 16, is an unsettling work that balances Gershwin's famous Rhapsody in Blue, which is performed by acclaimed solo pianist Michael Chertock.
105 W 4th St
Cincinnati,
OH
US
Roxx Electrocafe, located near the UC campus, boasts three 42-inch televisions and a massive 73-inch-wide screen that display heated bouts of digital competition across the café's spacious interior. Fourteen powerful gaming computers ($4/hour) enable activities such as cooperative robotic testing in the depths of Portal 2 or competitive right-clicking contests on the battlefields of League of Legends or Heroes of Newerth. Late-night hours yield to marathon console-gaming sessions of Marvel vs. Capcom 3, Halo 3, and Rock Band ($4/hour)—all fueled by iced coffees ($2.50) and smoothies ($4), which ensure proper hydration and appropriate glottal lubrication. As the café's four Xbox 360s, four Wiis, and PlayStation 3 enchant eyes and coordinate drill teams of button-pressing thumbs, comfortable chairs and modern décor invite board games or study sessions.
214 Calhoun St
Cincinnati,
OH
US
Three community-centric Cincinnati theaters ? all locally owned and managed, serving local and national beer, premium wines, and a mix of the best indie and commercial films. These efforts led to the Esquire receiving recognition from USA Today and CityBeat, which named it Cincinnati's "Best Movie Theatre" for the past seven years. At the Esquire, guests stop by for a diverse lineup of independent features, occasional live musical performances, and special events, including Q & A sessions. During films, guests top off their acclaimed popcorn with real butter. The Mariemont Theatre is historic in its own right, dating back more than 75 years, also showing today's indie gems. The Kenwood Theatre, on the other hand, changes up the movie-going experience by serving sushi during mainstream flicks. Movie-goers can also dine on Frieda's Desserts and Graeter's Ice Cream as they kick back in the digital state-of-the-art contemporary theater.
320 Ludlow Ave.
Cincinnati,
OH
US
Clifton Meadows Tennis and Swim Club maintains a 10-acre facility of three recirculating swimming pools and six tennis courts (two with artificial grass) to support its dedicated teams of racket-handlers and swan-divers. Tennis instructor Ben Britton, head of the tennis team, also conducts private and group lessons to help students master spin better than a yo-yo champion politician. The private lesson affords the opportunity for thwackers to take in some personal practice with Ben; guests can also elect to join group lessons to hone their serves, forehands, and Hulk hands.
4045 Egbert Ave
Cincinnati,
OH
US
The bowling alleys at Crossgate Lanes, Stone Lanes, and Eastgate Lanes invite gamers to send balls down gleaming runways in expansive, family-friendly facilities. Those weary of drawing straws to count the pins after each ball can take comfort in automatic scoring at all three locations. Each alley also hosts regular glow bowling, with lighting more luminescent than the water-wheel-powered disco balls of the 1970s. Patrons of Stone Lanes can also relax after their games in an onsite lounge, which is outfitted with three televisions.
3746 Montgomery Rd.
Norwood,
OH
US
Advertisement