Sightseeing in Claremont

Up to 46% Off at Montshire Museum of Science

Norwich, VT

$28 $16

(80)

Museum dazzles adults and kids with more than 125 hands-on exhibits from leaf cutter ants to dust devils

Up to 47% Off Zoo Admission at Charmingfare Farm

Candia

$17 $9

Zoo houses farm animals as well as bears, camels, and reindeer; trail rides take visitors through meadows, woods, and old logging roads

53% Off Wine-Lovers Package at Candia Vineyards

Candia

$116 $55

Wine lovers receive a tasting for two, a voucher for dessert wine, chocolates, a wind chime, New England wine book, and a pruning seminar

Up to 45% Off Scenic Adirondack Train Ride

Saratoga Springs

$50 $29

(87)

Train with domed dining cars offers panoramic views of the Hudson River and Adirondacks

40% Off Introductory Helicopter Flight Lesson

North Andover

$215 $129

FAA-approved helicopter flight instructors; aspiring aviators pilot a Robinson helicopter for 20 minutes while an HD video camera records

50% Off Tickets to the American Independence Museum

Exeter

$12 $6.75

(12)

View a Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence as well as historic furnishings, textiles, and military ephemera

Up to 56% Off a Wine-Tasting Experience

Sweet Baby Vineyard

$34 $15

Sip six samples of wine while snacking on cheese plates; take home souvenir wineglasses and wine purchased with a discount

Worcester Historical Museum – 50% Off Visit

Worcester Historical Museum

$20 $10

Library with 7,000 titles and exhibits with items such as Civil War–era diaries and colonial weapons highlight Worcester history

Up to 43% Off Newburyport Whale Watch Tour

Newburyport

$48 $29

Passengers head out to sea aboard a custom whale-watching craft to enjoy the majestic mammals, aided by an onboard naturalist

Up to 61% Bike Tour of Newburyport

Newburyport

$96 $39

Explore downtown Newburyport’s historic sites as well as Plum island during informative bike tours

Up to 67% Off Lunch in Lighthouse for Up to Four

Newburyport

$900 $299

Meal of soup or salad, entree, and dessert at a private table with harbor views from the top of a historic lighthouse

50% Off Ghost Tour from Ghosts of Albany

Albany

$30 $15

Tour guides lead 90-minute strolls through haunted locales and tell tales of scandal interwoven with historical facts

50% Off a Haunted-History Walking Tour

Multiple Locations

$50 $25

A two-hour walking tour covers most haunted areas and allows guests to conduct their own paranormal investigation

Select Local Merchants

Emerson Umbrella Center for the Arts began as a high school. Built in 1929, the town's first steel-beamed building was filled with bright young minds for more than half a century. But when the school outgrew its building, it moved, and set the stage for for the structure's second life. Emerson Umbrella's group of founding volunteers created a community-arts center that saved the building from demolition while also sticking to its original spirit, ensuring it be used for education. Today, owned by the town and managed by Emerson Umbrella, the center hosts studio space for more than 50 artists, workshops and classes for kids and grown-ups, a performance space for arts events of all disciplines, and just as many standardized biology tests.

40 Stow St
Concord,
MA
US

Arriving in Paris after leading a scientific expedition through northern China, Sterling Clark was just another Boxer Rebellion veteran and Yale-educated engineer looking for something to do with the inheritance of his magnate grandfather, Robert Clark, who was an heir to the Singer sewing-machine fortune. Like the countless men who found themselves in the same position, Sterling did the only thing left to do at that point of his adventurous life: invest in art.

Sterling and his wife Francine both displayed a discriminating eye for art in their first year of collecting, almost immediately acquiring a piece by the sought-after painter Hyacinthe Rigaud, who was famous for his portraiture of 17th-century European nobility and drawing the most realistic-looking stick people. The Clarks' tastes evolved over time, and their collection ballooned to include more than 30 paintings by Renoir and dozens of works by other impressionist artists.

In 1955, a year before Sterling passed away, he and Francine founded their art institute, where the museum's curators presently stay true to the couple's artistic interests. French impressionism still forms the crux of the collection, but the museum's scope is ever expanding and nowadays includes works of early photographers and American painters and a rotating schedule of well-curated special exhibitions.

225 South St
Williamstown,
MA
US

The first and only toy museum in the world solely dedicated to aviation-related toys, the Top Fun Aviation Toy Museum hosts nearly 2,000 vintage and modern toys from around the world. Housed inside a former schoolhouse, Top Fun has since converted into an airy exhibit space with a multicolor airplane command center and model airports quizzically anchored to the walls. Enter a nostalgic enclave of blue-bathed walls, and peep at the historic tin flyers from Japan, Hungary, Germany, and the United States. Kids can whimsically surround themselves in toy models piloted by Bugs Bunny, Mickey Mouse, Olive Oyl, and popular Latvian cartoon character David Hasselhoff.

21 Prichard St
Fitchburg,
MA
US

The Fitchburg Art Museum, one of North Worcester County's oldest cultural institutions, edifies eyes with a dozen prismatic galleries boasting a broad collection of European and American paintings, drawings, ceramics, and decorative art pieces. Cultural connoisseurs soak up a showcase of Greek, Roman, Asian, and pre-Columbian antiquities as well as artwork created by emerging and contemporary artists. The Jude Peterson Photography Collection, for instance, consists of 96 photographs including ethereal landscapes shot in stunning black-and-white that were collected by Jude Peterson, a New England art collector and museum supporter. The Fitchburg Art Museum also claims to provide a great introduction to museum culture for young kids who have grown tired of ball pits but still yearn for eye-catching entertainment.

185 Elm St
Fitchburg,
MA
US

In 1843, Charles Lane and Amos Bronson Alcott—father to writer Louisa May Alcott—founded a utopian and transcendentalist community in the fields of Harvard. More than 70 years later, visionary Clara Endicott Sears was so moved by their experiment that she decided to establish a museum on the same site to preserve its history. Today, the Fruitlands Farmhouse stands as a testament to the original settlers’ ingenuity, which surfaced in their trailblazing thoughts on veganism, sustainable living, and harnessing moon beams to power home stereo equipment.

Clara has incorporated the Shakers’ original office into Fruitlands, where it now shows off Shaker artwork and artifacts, many of which were donated by the Shakers themselves. Since then, the museum has also collected a curated assortment of more than 1,000 Native American artifacts, as well as a longhouse, dugout canoe, and traditional garden.

The brains behind the museum are still innovating today, curating permanent additions such as an art gallery with Hudson River School Landscapes. In addition to organizing school field trips, the staff also hires experts to teach classes and workshops on sketching scenes from nature, painting watercolor landscapes, and constructing 3D sculptures.

102 Prospect Hill Rd
Harvard,
MA
US

The Amherst College–owned Emily Dickinson Museum preserves the memory and work of the poet and hyphen master by maintaining the estate where she lived and composed many of her nearly 1,800 poems. The museum includes The Homestead, her birthplace and longtime residence, which stands near The Evergreens, where her brother, Austin, lived with his family. Emily and her siblings were all avid gardeners, cultivating flowers and hedges throughout their 3-acre estate. Emily herself maintained a conservatory for her collection of exotic plants, and she drew endless inspiration from her natural surroundings for her work.

The Emily Dickinson Museum welcomes field trips for groups of students and schedules events throughout the year to celebrate her poetry and role in American literary history. Interactive poetry discussion groups meet at various Amherst locations, keeping Dickinson's style relevant by communicating only in rhyming quatrains.

280 Main St
Amherst,
MA
US