Museums in Clarksburg

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Sandy Spring Museum preserves artifacts and archival records from Sandy Spring?s storied past as an 18th-century Quaker community that eventually grew into what was at the time one of Maryland?s cultural and industrial hubs. In several exhibits, some of which rotate periodically, visitors can walk through a traditional farmhouse kitchen from a bygone era, explore the area?s historical social clubs, or learn about the plight of one of the country?s first and oldest communities of African American landowners. The museum also hosts events and community programs, such as a historic homes tour.

17901 Bentley Road
Ashton Sandy Spring,
MD
US

The Heritage Farm Museum edifies and entertains visitors with its exhibits and collections on agrarian life in Loudoun County. Families of two adults plus children, grandchildren, and all imaginary friends under 18 receive free admission for one year plus eight free guest passes, allowing them to explore the many hands-on displays with as many hands as they can round up. Play customer or storekeeper in the authentic collections of the Waxpool General Store exhibit, or pay a visit to the children's farm exhibit where youngsters can milk a lifelike cow, collect eggs from virtual chickens, and tool around on miniature farm vehicles.

21668 Heritage Farm Ln
Sterling,
VA
US

Satisfy sky-centric curiosity with the College Park Aviation Museum's 27,000 square feet of cloud-plowing attractions, set on the historic grounds of the world's oldest continuously operating airport. This Smithsonian-affiliated museum's pride is a restoration shop, which makes once-grand beauties look as flight-ready as a seagull strapped to a jet pack. Ten vintage and reproduced aircraft are arrayed in the main gallery, including a reproduction of the Wright Model B from 1910 and a 1941 Boeing Stearman. Exhibits chart the nonvehicular history of flight, such as the Fly Now! showcase of international aviation posters dating back to 1860. Petite pilots may explore kid-friendly displays, sitting in the cockpit of the Imagination Plane, a 1939 blue Taylorcraft, or go to the hands-on room to dress in flight-ready uniform.

1985 Corporal Frank Scott Dr
College Park,
MD
US

Considered to be the country's only public museum devoted to the history of global espionage, the International Spy Museum teems with multimedia displays, hands-on activities, and educational events. Filled with low-lit halls and mysterious doors, the museum backs up its exhibits with experience; many of its board members, staff, and speakers are former spies. Executive Director Peter Earnest, for one, spent more than 35 years in the CIA and its National Clandestine Service; frequent speaker Oleg Kalugin once held a position as major general of the KGB. Through special talks and an array of exhibits, the group reveals several hundred years of spy techniques and gadgetry, showcases connections between real spies and pop culture, and draws from international backgrounds to grant a global perspective.

In the Exquisitely Evil: 50 Years of Bond Villains exhibit, visitors explore the most memorable villains from throughout the James Bond film series, discovering the role the series played in shaping public perception of spying and exploring how the villains changed to reflect their times. Featuring over 110 movie and historic artifacts, a series galleries allows visitors to learn about the wide variety of evildoers from many perspectives. For an additional charge, guests can opt to embark on a simulated covert mission entirely based on real intelligence case files in Operation Spy, a one-hour interactive exhibit during which participants ride in simulated truck beds and use video surveillance to find leaked nuclear-trigger technology in a fictional country.

800 F Street Northwest
Washington,
DC
US

William Wilson Corcoran believed in American artists at a time when most collectors bought only European paintings. The financier-turned-philanthropist made friends with masters such as Thomas Doughty and George Inness, bought what interested him, and even opened up his home twice a week so the public could view his collection. And that practice was the seed which grew into the Corcoran Gallery of Art. The formal location opened in 1874 with 98 paintings and sculptures from Corcoran's personal collection. Today, that collection exceeds 16,000.

The focus on 18th- to 20th-century American artists such as Mary Cassatt and Andy Warhol remains—but that doesn't mean the gallery has blinders on. It also holds works by European luminaries such as Pablo Picasso and Edgar Degas. The collection even extends into decorative art such as the Salon Doré, an 18th-century French period room once housed in Paris's Hôtel de Clermont.

In the same way the Corcoran Gallery extends beyond American art, it pushes its purpose beyond simply displaying masterpieces. Year-round events include lectures from prominent critics as well as live performances and wine mixers. The Corcoran even nurtures the next generation of talent with after-school and weekend classes that teach students how to draw everything from landscapes to landscapes covered with bowls of fruit.

500 17th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

The Phillips Collection emerged from one man's passion for art. Duncan Phillips filled his 19th-century Georgian Revival house with artwork, and he invited others to come and look at his collection. In 1921, the home formally became a museum of modern art. Impressionist and modern works fill its walls, and the collection continues to grow to accommodate contemporary artists.

  • Size: rotating exhibits and a permanent collection of 3,000+ works
  • Crown Jewel: Luncheon of the Boating Party, a 19th-century painting depicting an idyllic day at the Maison Fournaise restaurant
  • Eye Catcher: the Rothko Room, which was specifically built to showcase expressionist Mark Rothko's colors
  • Don't Miss: a meditative chamber made from 440 pounds of beeswax
  • The Building: the original Phillips house as well as more modern expansions
  • Special Programs: Phillips after 5 (first Thursday of every month)
  • Pro Tip: A favorite painting may move around?the museum frequently changes the arrangement of its permanent collection
1600 21st St. NW
Washington,
DC
US