Movies in Old Brooklyn

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For a few days in November, Euclid projection screens light up with the visions of independent artists. That's thanks to the Ohio Independent Film Festival, the flagship event of Independent Pictures. This year's festival features short and full-length films in a range of styles, including the documentary Project: ICE and dark coming-of-age drama B.F.E.. Above all, the four-day festival promises to introduce emerging filmmakers to audiences who otherwise might not get chance to see their work.

6516 Detroit Avenue
Cleveland,
OH
US

With this deal, movie buffs can scarf down popcorn while watching action-packed celluloid at one of seven different locales, including Cleveland Heights' Cedar Lee Theatre, which won a Scene magazine readers' poll for Best Movie Theater. Catch a flick at the historic Capitol Theatre, nestled in the Gordon Square Arts District, a renovated three-screen spot featuring Hollywood, specialty, and 3D films. Arty cinephiles can catch an independent or foreign film at the Cedar Lee Theatre, where the concession stand slings out tasty baked goods, sandwiches, specialty coffees, and more. Many of Cleveland Cinemas' other theaters boast multiple screens, digital sound, a Groucho Marx robot that quips one-liners from the balcony, and stadium seating for ideal movie gawking.

1390 West 65th Street
Cleveland,
OH
US

Sistah Sinema started, alliteratively, in Seattle. The mission is simple: to celebrate queer women of color in film. Each month, the team screens a movie created by a queer woman of color, followed by a discussion, in which viewers share their thoughts and unanimous feeling that popcorn could become popular. The events in Seattle drew such a following, that organizers quickly expanded across the country, to cities such as Portland, Greensboro, and Atlanta. The collective has displayed a diverse patchwork of films ranging for rom-coms and dramas to documentaries.

2220 Superior Viaduct
Cleveland,
OH
US

Every year, Cinema at the Square takes over the Palace Theatre's 20'x47' screen to treat moviegoers to an eclectic lineup of classic flicks. With a restored 1927 Kimball organ played before the films, the month-long festival transports viewers back in time, allowing them to forget their everyday cares and give fellow show-goers new everyday cares by dumping a pack of Milk Duds into their purse. The Palace Theatre was originally built in the roaring '20s, and proffers the perfect locale for breathless escapism, with rich red carpet and a lobby dominated by a sweeping marble staircase.

1501 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland,
OH
US

A 150-foot wind turbine heralds the entryway of Great Lakes Science Center. Combined with a 300-foot solar canopy, the turbine supplies 6% of the museum's power but also serves another purpose: to drive home the science center's commitment to research, education, and scientific discovery. Inside the Alternative Energy exhibit, visitors can touch their fingertips to a kiosk that displays real-time and historical data on energy consumption. Or, at the Steamship William G. Mather, visitors can explore a four-story engine room that once propelled the 618-foot flagship. After exploring the lunar lander models and flight simulators of the NASA Glenn Visitor Center, visitors can track moon dust to the Omnimax Theater and absorb scientific knowledge through 11,600 watts of digital sound.

In addition to presenting exhibits to more than 300,000 visitors annually, the science center leads the charge on science education. Onsite scientists organize space and curriculum for freshmen in the Cleveland metropolitan school district's inaugural STEM high school. The school teaches in a project-based learning environment where students are encouraged to delve into science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

601 Erieside Ave
Cleveland,
OH
US

Hailed by the New York Times as “one of the country’s best repertory movie theaters,” The Cleveland Institute of Art Cinematheque feeds eyes with a vast array of foreign and independent first-run films, silver-screen classics, and touring retrospectives. Cinematheque members notch $2–$3 off regular tickets to a lineup of 450 annual film screenings ($6 for a single film with membership, $12 for two films on the same day with membership). Guests can then stay up-to-date on the latest showings and plan outfits for the premieres of award-winning film trailers by reading the bi-monthly film schedule that is sent by mail or by tracking Cinematheque’s online extended film schedule. They can then head to the front row of the 616-seat Russell B. Aitken Auditorium to bask in the glow of films projected from vivid 35mm film.

11141 East Blvd
Cleveland,
OH
US