Beer, Wine & Spirits in Coeur d'Alene

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If one word had to describe Coeur d’Alene Cellars’ attitude toward winemaking, it would probably be "meticulous." During each stage of creation, from vineyard selection and harvest to bottling, winemakers carefully supervise and adjust conditions to suit their visions. They hand-harvest fruit from their eastern Washington vineyards only on days that fit specific temperature conditions. Between pickings, the vines are pruned for low yields that concentrate flavor and quality. And their syrah and viognier grapes are both hand-sorted the night of harvest before they’re pressed and fermented.

That process is carefully controlled as well. Syrah blends first ferment in open-top vessels, allowing for closer management of color and tannins. Only later do they age inside French and American oak barrels, like former daredevils bent on reliving their trip over Niagara Falls. Viognier blends, on the other hand, spend both fermentation and aging periods in small oak barrels.

The resulting well-balanced wines can claim myriad accolades from publications such as Wine Spectator and Wine Enthusiast. Their 2004 Sarah’s cuvée viognier, for instance, earned 89 points from Wine Enthusiast, which praised its "good balance" of "peach, apricot, sour lemon candy and even a bit of cinnamon." Current vintages include the 2007 Alder Ridge Vineyard syrah, whose smooth body supports flavors of berries, vanilla, and cinnamon that conclude in a lingering finish.

These and other wines are poured at Coeur d'Alene's onsite wine bar, Barrel Room No. 6. Inside, sleek red walls help create an upscale vibe. Glasses perch beneath pendant lighting on the bar or glitter on top of old wine barrels repurposed as tables. As customers sip, knowledgeable wait staff can suggest ways to bring out the wines' subtle flavors by nibbling aromatic cheese pairings or the hem of a neighbor’s freshly laundered shirt.

503 Sherman Avenue
Coeur D'Alene,
ID
US

When walking into Well-Read Moose's nondescript stone building, customers probably wouldn't expect a seven-foot Cat in the Hat to greet them with a hug. During a story time event in June 2014, though, that's exactly what happened. Interactive events like those are just one way of the many ways books come alive here. Even without large behatted felines, the store engages readers with author-hosted book readings and signings, as well as evening wine tastings. Well-Read Moose also sells coffee and pastries from local bakeries to keep guests fueled as they listen to their favorite writer or peruse the extensive collection, which ranges from children's classics to the latest adult thrillers.

2048 Main St.
Coeur D'Alene,
ID
US

With 50 competitors vying for $3,000 in prizes, the Battle Of The Homebrews rewards only the best amateur beers of the pack. A people's choice event, visitors get the chance to taste samples and vote for their favorite of the competition's concoctions. From the pack, the top 10 winners get cash prizes and the beer with the most votes earns the chance to be brewed in a large batch by professional brewers. The event comes to the masses with help from The Spokane Eastside Reunion Association, an organization whose mission is to bring local communities together to inspire residents and improve local neighborhoods.

3920 West 5th Avenue
Post Falls,
ID
US

Vintner Tim Nodland approaches blending his wines like arranging a song, which makes sense, because as a professional jazz musician he possesses an astute sense of creativity and balance. He describes his winery as being “more like a musician’s studio” and his wines as “liquid art.” Nodland's musical background inspires the names of wines such as "Bebop" and earned his winery a mention in Wine and Jazz magazine. Nodland Cellars produces only one red wine and one white wine every year, allowing the winery to focus all of its energy on refining each vintage. Nodland's meticulously selected grapes, sourced from quality Columbia Valley vineyards, are each handpicked before enjoying a gentle press in stainless steel. Each vintage, aged in 100% new french oak, uses a blend of six grapes, primarily made up of cabernet sauvignon and merlot, which recalls a classic bordeaux from the late 1700s or early 1800s. Nodland's private blend’s complex Old World flavor comes from rare carmenere grapes, which were wiped out in Europe by a phylloxera blight in the 1800s.

11616 E Montgomery Dr, Ste 70
Spokane,
WA
US

In 1982, Mike Conway walked away from more than a decade of large-scale wine production at E.&J. Gallo, Parducci, and Franzia Brothers to open Latah Creek Wine Cellars with his wife, Ellena. Today, with help from their daughter Natalie, they package more than 17,000 cases each year. The trio devotes much of their winemaking expertise to their most popular bottles, which include a riesling, Huckleberry L'Atah, and a chardonnay that Wine Press Northwest describes as "exotic and hedonistic." They develop each varietal with a minimal amount of processing and handling to keep flavors intact and prevent grapes from having reasons to make tell-all appearances on afternoon talk shows. The team can also swathe bottles in personalized wine labels for special occasions such as weddings and birthdays. The winery welcomes visitors to amble through its tiled walkways and arched courtyard, around the winemaking facilities, and into a gift shop teeming with trinkets and a well-stocked wine-tasting bar.

13030 E Indiana Ave
Spokane Valley,
WA
US

The owners of Spokane Winery Tours wanted to make a career of enjoying good food and drink, and realized the only thing they needed to do it was a bus. They created a logo, slapped it on the side of their first Wino Wagon, and began living their dream. They take groups of wine lovers and neophyte drinkers alike on tours Valley wineries, teaching them about the process behind creating a bottle. They also ferret out some of the best samples for the region has to offer for their guests to try.

10716 E Grace Ave
Spokane Valley,
WA
US