Chinese Restaurants in Colesville

Select Local Merchants

8613 16th St
Silver Spring,
MD
US

Since 1987, Seven Seas has served the Washington metropolitan area with authentic Chinese cuisine, featuring a number of entrees that go well beyond the standard offerings. Browse the lunch or dinner menus for a variety of savory seafood selections, such as the fresh squid, sautéed in a black-bean sauce, then garnished with green peppers, onions, and jalapenos ($12.95). Or try the lightly battered shrimp topped with premium walnuts ($16.95). Those leaning toward chicken can keep leaning, eventually falling face-first into the string bean Szechuan, which features minced chicken stir-fried in a light brown sauce ($9.95). With chefs who have experience with Mandarin, Cantonese, Szechuan, Taiwanese, and American methods of cooking, Seven Seas’ massive menu will satisfy even the pickiest of diners. To drink, Seven Seas offers a hodgepodge of Oriental and Californian wines, plus premium sake, such as the Sho Chiku Bai Organic Nama ($16), a libation that’s as balanced as a tabby-cat gymnast.

1776 E Jefferson St
Rockville,
MD
US

5540 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

As the most populous city in the world, Shanghai has been shaped by travelers and settlers from all over. This is particularly evident in the city's food, which has been influenced by the culinary styles from both the northern and southern regions of China, as well as dishes from throughout the entire continent of Asia. This cultural integration holds true at Shanghai Café, where the chefs use recipes the Hu family has spent the past half-century perfecting. These recipes follow various Shanghai cooking principles—for instance, the original flavors of meats and fish are allowed to shine through rather than being drowned out by heavy marinades or sauces that are too sweet or salty.

Though the recipes are traditional, they respect modern, healthful eating habits by incorporating natural broths and stocks and limiting the use of oil. Some of the restaurant's signature dishes include boiled dumplings, steamed pork buns, and dim sum—a Shanghai staple. In the spirit of Shanghai's pan-Asian tendencies, the menus also include Thai dishes, such as pad kee mao (drunken noodles), nigiri, sashimi, and maki.

12944 Travilah Rd
Potomac,
MD
US

Many DC restaurants have attempted to mix and match cuisines with varying degrees of failure. Here are some of the city's most recent and biggest dining flops:

5018 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Under red droplights that resemble Chinese paper lanterns, seared tuna glistens atop a Rising Sun roll. On the other side of the sushi bar, a uniformed chef slices more fresh fish, packing it into 1 of 17 specialty rolls that grace Wok and Roll’s menu. Out of view from the dining room’s lacquered tables and rows of sake, a wok sizzles with chow mein and rice noodles, the other half of Wok and Roll’s pan-Asian offerings. Dishes such as peking duck and hong kong shrimp-wonton soup source recipes from across China and pair with beers from Thailand, Singapore, and Japan, as well as with daiquiris mined from the Earth’s liquid fruit core. Diners in groups of 10 or more with a reservation, can put Wok and Roll’s karaoke system to use and belt out a tune from a catalogue of 50,000 songs.

2400 18th St NW
Washington,
DC
US