Jazz Clubs in Collingswood

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Come hungry and leave happy! Chris' Jazz Cafe in Philadelphia aims to please even the pickiest eater. Come prepared to feast at Chris' Jazz Cafe — with no low-fat options, any diets will need to be put aside for the moment. Chris' Jazz Cafe patrons can also take advantage of the many drink options offered here. Bigger groups gravitate toward Chris' Jazz Cafe, which offers a private section for your next get-together or celebration. Make sure to check out Chris' Jazz Cafe's happy hour for a great way to decompress from the workday. Tap your foot to Chris' Jazz Cafe's tunes — live performances are often showcased here. Noise levels at the restaurant can be ear-piercing, so save the t te- -t tes for another night.

Fridays and Saturdays really bring in the crowds, so make sure there's space for you by calling ahead for a reservation. Looking for something delicious to serve at your next party? Chris' Jazz Cafe also offers catering.

For those that choose to drive, the restaurant is conveniently located next to a parking lot and a garage.

Chris' Jazz Cafe offers a nice selection of mid-range cuisine, so you can expect a meal there to cost about $30 or less per person. Chris' Jazz Cafe accepts all major credit cards, including Visa, Mastercard, Discover, and American Express.

1421 Sansom St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Treat yourself to tasty, homemade barbecue at Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ in Philadelphia. No need to miss out on Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ just because you are avoiding fat or gluten. The restaurant has tons of options that can accommodate your dietary needs. Complement you meal with a beer or wine from Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ delightful drink menu. Check out the brews and bites at happy hour, and kick back without spending a fortune. There's no need to winnow the guest list for a night out at Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ — the restaurant has tons of space for big parties. Patrons are often seen swaying in their seats thanks to performances from Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ's live musical groups or DJs.

The crowds come out in force on Fridays and Saturdays, so don't neglect to make a reservation ahead of time. It doesn't get much more laid-back than Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ, so dress for comfort when you come.

Parallel-parking experts can find room on the street, though patrons also have access to the restaurant's adjoining lot.

Prices are affordable, with a typical meal running under $30. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are all available at Holy Smoke Bar, Restaurant and BBQ — swing by for for favorite meal.

473 Leverington Ave
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Craving finger food? Head to Washington Square West's Dirty Frank's Bar and chow down on classic pub fare. Low-fat and gluten-free options are featured on the menu as well. Whether you have something to celebrate or just need something to take the edge off, the drink menu at Dirty Frank's Bar won't disappoint. Unwind on a budget, and enjoy happy hour's low-cost beers and simple eats. The restaurant's noise level can be somewhat straining on the vocal cords, so intimate get-togethers may be best enjoyed elsewhere.

Interested in eating out over the weekend? Keep in mind that the restaurant gets swamped on Fridays and Saturdays, and service may take longer than expected. No need to dress up for a trip to Dirty Frank's Bar — the casual restaurant encourages laid-back attire.

You can leave your car curbside with nearby street parking.

You'll find your bill at Dirty Frank's Bar to be more than reasonable, with most meals costing less than $15. Don't leave the dollar bills at home — you'll need cash at Dirty Frank's Bar.

347 South 13th Street
Philadelphia,
PA
US

The minds behind The Bookstore Speakeasy know that the Roaring Twenties were about more than drinking bathtub gin and trying not to accidentally bathe in bathtub gin. The restaurant fully immerses patrons in the period, lighting their tables with candles and oil lamps and filling their ears with the bombast of live 1920s- and '30s-style jazz. And the bartenders behind their copper counter give a nod to the bootleggers of the past by preparing classic cocktails such as the Manhattan, the Rob Roy, and the Old Fashioned with fresh juices and hand-carved ice.

Yet the sizable selection of craft beers demonstrates the restaurant's willingness to incorporate some contemporary touches into the speakeasy experience, as does its menu of snacks and entrees. Between sips, groups can share artisanal meats and cheeses, crabmeat-stuffed mushrooms, and flatbreads topped with duck confit, plum-barbecue sauce, and smoked gouda.

336 Adams St
Bethlehem,
PA
US

In support of her high-decibel new album, Rihanna kicks off her hotly anticipated LOUD tour with emphatic gusto and a sizzling roster of special guests. Like an art show at a sundae bar, the LOUD tour floods the senses, enchanting audiences with lavishly designed sets, myriad costume changes, move-busting dancers, and Rihanna's songbook of Grammy magnets. Crooner Cee Lo Green augments the songful offerings with his own vocal talents, and Roc Nation rapper and rhythm scientist J. Cole further helps resuscitate ear drums traumatized by the outside world's blaring car horns and shrill howler monkeys.

Columbus Blvd. at Spring Garden St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Hershey Theatre

The Hershey Theatre, conceived in 1933 by noted philanthropist and chocolatier Milton S. Hershey, stands as an opulent tribute to the performing arts. Taking architectural cues from Saint Mark’s Basilica in Venice, the foyer’s towering arches gleam with golden paint and crystal chandeliers. The blue-and-gold mosaic that leads to the main seating area is the masterwork of two German artists who spent two years on its construction. Once inside the theater, audiences might think they’ve stepped onto the streets of Venice thanks to the atmospheric ceiling, stonework facades, and gondoliers paddling them to their seats. ####Bethel Woods Center for the Arts Music has permeated the 800 manicured acres where the Bethel Woods Center for the Arts has stood since 1969, when farmer Max Yasgur agreed to let love, peace, and harmony grow wild at the very first Woodstock festival. These days, the renowned outdoor venue and cultural center continues to attract the biggest acts in music to its pavilion stage. The open-air design ensures ample ventilation on the natural sloping lawn, and a roof protects up to 15,000 fans from inclement weather and the prying eyes of Cessna pilots.

69th & Ludlow
Upper Darby,
PA
US