Zoo in Colorado

Select Local Merchants

Ranked the No. 3 best thing to do in Denver by U.S. News & World Report, Denver Zoo hosts 3,500 different animals from more than 650 species, which blend with several interpretive exhibits. Sprawling naturalistic displays place animals in environments approximating their native habitats, giving a glimpse of exotic locales and diverse behavioral patterns. The Tropical Discovery exhibit boasts a 2,250-gallon pool teeming with piscine life and exotic turtles in a waterfall-lined indoor rainforest. Two prides of lions sprawl along rocky outcroppings in the lion kopje in Predator Ridge while African wild dogs, guineafowl, and spotted hyenas play a heated game of Yahtzee. Commune with ancient cousins in the seven-acre Primate Panorama, where chattering monkeys swing from trees while powerful gorillas amble freely about their one-acre exhibit.

2900 E 23rd Ave
Denver,
CO
US

Established: 2013
Reservations/Appointments: Required
Staff Size: 2–10 people
Average Duration of Services: 30–60 minutes
Pro Tip: Wear pants and a comfortable pair of shoes or boots. No flip flops or shorts.
Parking: Free street parking
Most Popular Attraction/Offering: FairyTails Ponies & The Fairylands
Recommended Age Group: All ages

11070 Hardy Road
Colorado Springs,
CO
US

Pueblo Zoo originates in three places, all within the city of Pueblo. At the start of the 20th century, three parks around the town displayed a menagerie of exotic animals, but during the 1920s, the zoo consolidated in the current 25-acre City Park location. The space gradually improved throughout the Great Depression as the Works Progress Administration added an animal house, tropical birdhouse, and bear pits. Now open year-round, the zoo houses its 120 different species in modern facilities, allowing visitors to peer at boa constrictors in the rainforest exhibit or watch penguins dive from an underwater viewing room. Favorite animals on display include playful otters and penguins as well as the majestic african lion.

3455 Nuckolls Ave
Pueblo,
CO
US

The annual Denver Country Fair brings to life an idea conceived in the 19th century: the people of Denver purchased a plot of land to host a county fair that would bring together merchants and revelers alike. Before their campaign could be fully realized, the nation was split in two as citizens began fighting in the Civil War. As a result, plans for a county fair were all but abandoned until new organizers took up the reins in 2011 to give the county a celebration all its own.

The three-day event invites fairgoers to explore 14 interlocking indoor pavilions, each with a different theme and activity. Inside the animal pavilion, audiences can watch dogs compete in a variety of games and agility courses. The kitchen pavilion entices revelers to get their fill of sweets and snacks, and while investigating the Denver History pavilion, visitors can learn local facts from the city's past, from its first railroads to how the town served as the world's last dinosaur sanctuary. Visitors can also try to win their own blue ribbon with more than 100 competitions.

4655 Humboldt Street
Denver,
CO
US

Cleaved through 30 acres of densely situated corn stalks, the Wild West Corn Maze tests voyagers’ senses of direction as they maneuver through the leafy corridors. The cornrows compose 10 distinct mazes, including one with a cowboys-and-aliens theme and an obstacle course where visitors challenge scarecrows to a barrel-rolling duel as they search for the exit. After moving through the agrarian labyrinth, guests with unlimited-level tickets can check out a number of other autumnal attractions, including tractor rides, a farm-animal petting zoo, and a pumpkin patch. The bucolic setting also boasts a massive jumping pillow—an inflatable mat where tykes can bounce in the open air—a pumpkin launcher and a corn cannon, both of which hearken back to the simpler days when all nautical warfare was waged with produce.

6876 County Road 47
Hudson,
CO
US

The Plains Conservation Center is an offshoot of the West Arapahoe Conservation District, an organization appointed in 1949 to teach farming and ranching techniques that could help prevent another devastating Dust Bowl. While the PCC's mission has since expanded, the nonprofit organization's main goal remains the same: preserving the health of Colorado's plains. Between its two sites—a main 1,100-acre location in Aurora and more than 10,000 acres spread along West Bijou Creek—the organization maintains several attractions devoted to the history and environmental character of the region. These include more than five miles of hiking trails, a Cheyenne camp from 1837 with four standing tepees, and Wells Crossing, a replica 1887 farm consisting of sod houses, and heirloom gardens. For more modern sites, the Aurora location's visitor center features interactive displays and seasonal events such as Hops for Habitat, an annual fundraiser with beer tastings from local craft brewers.

21901 E Hampden Ave
Aurora,
CO
US