Pubs in Coney Island

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Slabs of slate glisten in candlelight atop rustic wooden tables, where white slivers of artisanal cheeses or curlicues of charcuterie fill each stony plate. Nearby, One Stop Beer Shop's tap-pulls and bottle openers unleash foamy rivulets of imported and American beers from breweries such as Hofbrau, Leinenkugel, Rogue, Bellhaven, and Harpoon, whose names and compatible astrological signs are announced on a wall-mounted chalkboard menu. Lively happy hours pour discounted brews and spirited specialties, such as shots of whiskey or vodka chased by vials of pickle juice or borscht, and weekly special events, such as beer-pong and trivia night, test patrons' physical and mental dexterity. One Stop Beer Shop also preps growlers of popular brews for pickup and neighborhood delivery orders.

134 Kingsland Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

As clocks strike 5 p.m. across the country, happy hours everywhere celebrate the end of another long workday. Every night from 1 a.m. to 4 a.m., however, Black Swan heralds the dawn of a new day with its reverse happy hour. The late night festivity is one of many twists the New American gastropub puts on the traditional bar format. Along with pub staples such as fish and chips, chefs plate internationally inspired treats including a BLT amplified with farm-raised salmon, veggie empanadas, and chicken wings smothered in a sweet and spicy Thai sauce. Innovation continues behind the bar, where mixologists craft such off-kilter cocktails as the Hot "Bacon" Toddy, a blend of bacon-infused bourbon and maple syrup served with a strip of bacon. An extensive selection of liquor, wine, and beer is also available inside the space that was once an auto-body shop, now transformed into a "sleek hall with a long copper bar, jet-black hardwood walls, and hand-worn tables," according to New York Magazine.

1048 Bedford Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

A barrow boy pushes his cart past horse-drawn carriages, police on horseback, and a lady on a stroll, parasol in hand. This historical scene, appropriately tinted in sepia, hangs above diners at Pound & Pence, where it's one of two 10-foot murals that depict lively streets and pubs in 19th Century England. Pound & Pence's proprietors can't recreate the days of Dickens on all New York's streets, but they do conjure an old-timey vibe inside their establishment. A billiards table and leather wingback chairs stand among dark stained wood adorned with vintage English memorabilia.

The across-the-pond homage continues behind a bar stocked with English gins, an extensive scotch and cognac collection, and fixings for cocktails such as London Fog: a blend of gin, elderflower liquor, and lime juice. Pound & Pence's menu honors both English and American cuisine with selections ranging from bangers and housemade mash to spicy chicken fingers. During meals, up to 300 diners can chat with their neighbors or take in a game on one of the pub's more contemporary touches: a 10-foot HD projector screen.

55 Liberty St.
New York,
NY
US

The city of Nelson is literally a world away from the hum and hubbub of Manhattan. It sits under cerulean skies on the northern shore of New Zealand’s South Island, its residents epitomizing a laid-back attitude seen so rarely on New York’s crowded streets. As Nelson Blue's self-proclaimed "resident Kiwi," Pauli Morgan doesn’t seem to mind that he’s a bit of an anomaly. When he opened the restaurant and bar in the heart of the Financial District, he wanted to capture everything that he missed about his former home: the company, the cuisine, and the creativity. With the help of chef Eric Lind, he has done just that. New Zealand–inspired lamb skewers and grilled squid share the menu with savory beef pies from nearby Down Under Bakery. Morgan also props up his homeland’s economy by importing many of Nelson Blue’s beers and condiments directly from New Zealand. Homesick Kiwis can find solace in a pint of Moa beer or a glass filled with Wattie’s Tomato Sauce as they take in views of the Brooklyn Bridge from the bar’s patio.

235 Front Street
New York,
NY
US

The Pitch and Fork gracefully bestrides two worlds. With its dark wooden décor, mounted animal heads, and papered walls covered with an eclectic assortment of photographs and sketches, the eatery captures the charm of a European pub. At the same time, Executive Chef Jacob Bowser and his team create a menu that is steeped in European roots, yet still manages to showcase bits of New World flair. Seasonal and locally sourced ingredients help contribute to this sense of place, shining in dishes such as mussels in a white wine broth with cilantro, lime, and smoky chipotle peppers. To accompany this selection of gastropub cuisine, the bartenders slake thirsts with an array of craft beers and specialty cocktails.

1606 1st Ave
New York,
NY
US

At The Malt House, signature Black Angus Burger arrives fully loaded with applewood bacon, roasted cherry tomatoes, pickled red onion and queso sauce, alongside fried-chicken sandwiches, tempura pickles, and stuffed french toast. In addition to a full bar?which serves up drinks such as the Maltmosa, a blend of wheat beer, orange juice, and champagne?draughts have included craft beers from breweries such as Sierra Nevada and Ommegang. Patrons can find seating at a long bar lit by dangling bulbs, at high-topped tables angled at a sports-displaying television, or on a sidewalk patio.

206 Thompson St
New York,
NY
US