Amusement Parks in Cottage Lake

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Blanketed in wall-to-wall trampolines, Sky High Sports delights barefoot fun-seekers with springy terrain and an exclusive court for jumpers 8 and younger. Guests can hone front flips, back flips, and belly flops during intense free-bounce sessions. Each trampoline comes equipped with a specially designed spring-loaded frame and thick, 2-inch safety pads that grant patrons a landing cushier than a corner office at a marshmallow factory. Stuffed with blocks of spongy, body-molding material, a foam pit dares treasure-seekers to fling themselves in or scour its depths for the lost contents of bygone pockets. Pintsize aerialist posses can safely practice their synchronized Salchows on 360 degrees of trampoline walls while court supervisors watch from the sidelines and award hard-earned praise with oversize scorecards.

Sky High also offers AIRobics fitness classes and monthly dodge-ball tournaments to help jumpers explore the outermost stratospheres of trampoline possibilities.

1445 120th Avenue Northeast
Bellevue,
WA
US

From three locations, Family Fun Centers & Bullwinkle's Restaurant foster lifelong memories for kids and their caretakers as they bond over bouts of miniature golf, laser-tag shootouts, and bumper-car derbies. Visitors taller than 58 inches challenge each other to go-kart races, while smaller thrill seekers practice Napoleonic siege techniques at the indoor fun fortress. Outside, human slingshots hurl visitors safely through the air in harnessed flights, and indoor rollercoaster simulators re-create the twists and turns of amusement-park rides or malfunctioning monorails. After perfecting swings at 18 holes of mini golf or 25-pitch batting cages, visitors chow down at the Bullwinkle-themed restaurant, feasting on crowd-pleasing park fare such as pizza, burgers, salads, wraps, and corn dogs. Attractions vary by location. Valid only at the Tukwila and Edmonds locations.

7212 220th St SW
Edmonds,
WA
US

Working from the founder's family recipe, Seattle Fudge's confectioners begin each batch by boiling ingredients—including chocolate, dairy cream, and nuts—in a copper kettle. After cooling the fudge on a marble table—a process that often sends the confection flying through the air—they form 25-pound loaves by hand. The whole process is on display at Seattle Fudge's red-and-white open kitchen, where onlookers can track every ingredient's journey from the kettle to trays of free samples. The store's 11 flavors include almond toffee crunch, chocolate amaretto, and minty, Oreo-specked vanilla fudge called Grasshopper, named in honor of the insect with an Oreo-only diet.

Along with the signature treat, Seattle Fudge's candy makers whip up saltwater taffy, showcasing old-fashioned taffy pullers and cutters. Available in blue raspberry and pink vanilla, cotton candy is also spun fresh onsite. Tubs of regular and caramel popcorn offer salty alternatives to sweet snacks. In addition to Seattle Center, where the fudge shop has been a fixture since 1981, Seattle Fudge's sweets are sold at local fairs and festivals throughout the year.

305 Harrison St
Seattle,
WA
US

In the early 1950s, Prentice Bloedel retired early from leading his family's timber business and devoted all his time to the creation of his gardens. A pioneer in renewable resources and sustainability?Bloedel was the first to use sawdust as a fuel in his mills?he was deeply interested in how people fit into the natural world. Today, the Bloedel Reserve stands as a testament to that interest, a world-renowned public garden with 150 acres of landscapes and natural woodlands for guests to lose themselves in.

Here, visitors build bonds with nature simply by walking around, which is far safer than agreeing to a blind date with an azalea bush. During a stroll across the Reserve, visitors come upon the moss garden and its living carpet, stop for quiet contemplation at the reflection pool, and join a cast of wild critters at the bird refuge. Of all the property's features, though, the Puget Sound view might be most impressive. This panoramic vista to the northeast peers out across the Puget Sound, Jefferson Point, and the Cascade Mountains, giving a glimpse of the nature's grandeur.

7571 NE Dolphin Dr
Bainbridge Island,
WA
US

The buzz of motors rises and falls as bright-red blurs zip around the track at PGP Motorsports Park. Here, in the shadow of Mount Rainier, racers ages 15 and older loop around an 8/10-mile track at speeds of up to 48 miles per hour, leaning back in the ergonomic seats of Italian-built Birel N35 karts. The 30-foot-wide asphalt track can be altered to take on 12 different configurations and is centered in a velodrome, which puts spectators at an elevated angle so they get a good line of sight no matter where they sit.

For safety reasons, drivers should wear long sleeves and pants and closed-toe shoes. Drivers are equipped with helmets and driving suits, and since races take place rain or shine, they will also be provided with rain gear that includes waterproof gloves and booties.

31003 144th Ave. SE
Kent,
WA
US

Shrieking giggles and scurrying feet fill Odyssey 1?s colorful confines, where tykes enjoy high-energy adventures in an indoor jungle gym, a space-age laser-tag arena, and a buzzing arcade center. Sock-clad kids aged 10 and younger can bound and climb through the jungle gym, which offers swings, slides, ball pits, and a cushy area designed for toddlers. Players dodge a barrage of futuristic beams in the laser-tag arena, open to guests aged 7 and older. Popular games including Guitar Hero and Connect Four await at the game center, where players can harvest tickets redeemable for fun prizes.

2310 W Mildred St.
Tacoma,
WA
US