Groceries & Markets in Dallas

$43 for a 1-Year Membership and One Box of Assorted Organic Produce from Johnson's Backyard Garden ($84 Value)

Johnson's Backyard Garden

Multiple Locations

$84 $43

(31)

Members can pay to receive weekly or biweekly delivery of 10–12 in-season, organically grown vegetables, fruits, and herbs

Healthy Take-Home Meals from Pick a Fit Foods (Up to 50% Off)

Pick a Fit Foods

Dallas

$20 $10

The Pick A Fit kitchen prepares nutritious meals, such as grilled Southwest chicken with pico de gallo, that can be picked up and taken home

Jerky, Bacon, and Barbecue Goods at Meat Maniac (50% Off). Two Options Available.

Meat Maniac

Richardson

$20 $10

Novelty items such as wild-game jerky and bacon-flavored salsas, ketchups, and sodas; barbecue sauces and seasonings

$15 for Three Groupons, Each Valid for $10 Worth of Coffee and Snacks at White Rhino Coffee ($30 Total Value)

White Rhino Coffee

Cedar Hill

$10 $5

Coffeehouse drinks and snacks, including drip coffee and house-baked cookies

$18 for $30 Worth of Fresh-Prepared Meals, Bread and Pastries at Eatzi’s Market & Bakery - Grapevine

Eatzi's Market & Bakery

Grapevine

$30 $18

This European-style marketplace and deli features chef-prepared meals for breakfast, lunch, and dinner

$12 for $20 Worth of Local Groceries at The Milk Pail Local Market & Drive Thru

The Milk Pail Local Market & Drive Thru

Allen

$20 $12

Local market with fresh produce, artisan breads, deli meats, and ready-to-eat meals

Condiment Trio Gift Package or $10 for $20 Worth of Sauces, Rubs, and Condiments at Smokin' Texas Gourmet

Smokin' Texas Gourmet

Keller

$20 $10

Gourmet rubs, salsas, steak sauce, hot sauces, and seasonings handcrafted in Texas without MSG or preservatives

Select Local Merchants

Rich Rogers’s favorite part of family meals was always after plates had been cleaned, when his Italian clan would kick back around the table and tell stories for hours on end. His grandfather, Peter Scardello, was a big part of that. Peter relayed to Rich the importance of a great meal, particularly the way it can knit family and friends together. So when Rich and Karen Rogers opened Scardello, it was only fitting that the artisan cheese shop be named after Peter. Today, Rich is following in the footsteps of his grandfather, cooking feasts for friends and family that often end with nibbles of cheese. It’s his way of keeping guests around the table long enough to swap stories, like his family did all those years ago. Scardello’s selection includes about 150 cheeses hailing from Europe and America, some from right in Texas. Though not all are farmstead cheeses, they’re all artisanal—that means handcrafted by humans, not made by machine or produced by accidentally leaving cattle in the hot sun. The cheeses rotate seasonally, but don’t worry if you don’t see the same goat cheese you grabbed last time. The shop’s happy to track your purchases, so you’ll know immediately whether your favorite’s in stock, and the staff will happily slice you a sample of any cheese in the case. That might make it a little bit easier when it comes time to order and they cut as hefty or petite a wedge as you like, straight from the wheel.

Scardello’s employees can also help customers match the perfect accompaniment with cheese, whether that means craft beer or wine, bread or crackers, or locally crafted goodies from Dude, Sweet Chocolate. For those who’d rather do it themselves, there are various classes available. These might involve anything from exploring the basics of cheesemaking to addressing the question of whether beer or wine goes better with certain cheeses—an age-old debate that brings most dairy-farm-family reunions to a heated end.

3511 Oak Lawn Ave
Dallas,
TX
US

Part-time personal chef Steven Bailey was growing tired of bland, industrially processed food. As detailed by D Magazine, Steven was determined to do something about his frustration, so he hit the road one weekend in his Volkswagen Rabbit and began scouring Texas farms and markets for fresher ingredients. The more organic, locally grown food he brought back, the more friends and neighbors started requesting some for themselves. The growing demand led Steven to start Urban Acres, where customers can track down organic produce, dairy, and grass-fed meats from local farmers and artisans who never use pesticides, hormones, artificial flavoring, or shoddy magnetic force fields.

As a member of Urban Acres, members pick large, medium, or small shares of organic fruits and veggies, as well as meat, coffee, and granola shares if desired. Urban Acres also sells locally grown grub to members and nonmembers alike at its Oak Cliff Farmstead, which D Magazine says "brings a bit of country to the big city." There, visitors can find shelves and counters fashioned from reclaimed wood, a bee colony on the roof, and produce snuggled in boxes of hay. Urban Acres also offers hands-on educational opportunities to learn about small-scale urban farming.

1301B W Davis St
Dallas,
TX
US

MEDermis Facials' board-certified medical director captains a team of certified laser specialists and medical aestheticians, who help their clients reach aesthetic goals with the help of advanced technology. Together, the team has safely erased more than 200,000 unwanted tattoos of all shapes, sizes, and colors using Lutronic Spectra lasers. The cutting-edge apparatuses emit q-switched beams of high-energy light, which help disband ink particles and prepare them to be naturally jettisoned from the body via the lymphatic system?technical speak for "laser eraser". The lasers flit over skinscapes, fostering smooth, even skin with minimal risk of scarring, disrupting natural pigments, or attracting bored cats. In addition to getting rid of unwanted ink, the talented staff can also help to correct skin troubles with peels, microdermabrasion, and other skin care services.

13465 Inwood Rd
Dallas,
TX
US

Sharon Meehan conceived Ham I Am! out of a love and a passion for good food and a committment to sell only the very best. We decided good meats should have a tasty condiment to go alongside of them, so we came up with HOGWASH, and rarely ship a ham without a jar of HOGWASH to accompany it.

17618 Davenport Rd
Dallas,
TX
US

From its humble beginnings as a single Austin store in 1980, Whole Foods Market has grown into a gleaming and organic grocery empire, comprised of healthful mega-marts that lean toward all things natural. From the extensive selection of organic produce to grass-fed beef, free-range chicken, sustainable seafood and a wide array of vegetarian, vegan and gluten-free specialty products, anyone familiar with the concept of globally-conscious living would be happy to get their shopping done inside. At this Lakewood location, Dallas hippies both young and hold can fawn over tofu ice cream, environmentally-friendly cleaning products and endless vitamin supplements, spanned across long, well-stocked aisles inside the airy and inviting space. Best of all, this Whole Foods boasts its own in-store bar, where shoppers can enjoy a local craft beer or fill up a growler on their way home.

2118 Abrams Rd
Dallas,
TX
US

In 1728, Friedrich Kuby opened his sausage and specialty meat market in Kaiserslautern, Germany. But it would take 230 more years before Friedrich’s sausage-making techniques made their way to Texas—courtesy of direct descendant Karl Kuby. Kuby’s Sausage House is now a hub for high-quality cuts of luncheon meats and gourmet cheeses, as well as for the family’s famous German-style sausages. The staff also bakes a full selection of European breads and pastries daily, and creates full German meals such as the Wurst teller—a sausage plate served with a scoop of homemade sauerkraut and German potato salad. Also on site at Kuby’s Sausage House is a wild game processing facility. Just like the staff in the deli, the meat processors use Friedrich Kuby’s method for making venison sausage. They can also turn wild game into bacon, bratwurst, chorizo, and jerky.

6601 Snider Plz
Dallas,
TX
US