Arts & Entertainment in Oak Cliff

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After more than 35 years, the walls at Paperbacks Plus in Mesquite couldn't cope with all the books. So the owners expanded into the city proper, setting up two new shops under the name Lucky Dog Books. Shelf after shelf of volumes greets the eye at each location; alongside the paperbacks and hardbacks sit myriad other forms of media, from used CDs and DVDs to LPs, magazines, and comic books young and old. Chairs dot the landscape at all three bookstores, inviting customers to flop down and flip through the pages of a novel or pretend to read a comic book that conceals a history textbook. In addition to selling its wares, Lucky Dog Books also offers cash or store credit for used items and takes its services on the road with a Books at Home program.

633 W Davis St
Dallas,
TX
US

The Bishop Street Market sits on the corner of the trendy Bishop Art’s District neighborhood and beckons the passerby to come on in. On the outside there is a country scene painting that adorns the large brick wall. Inside, there is everything from home products to jewelry, to unusual gifts that are hard to find anywhere else. Folks come from miles around to find just the right card for any occasion. Don’t expect just another market either, Bishop Street Market still offers complimentary gift wrapping or free gift bags and tissue for the last minute shopper. Another stand-out out is the art by well-known artist Austin James, the store sells everything from his crosses to large wall hangings. This is one street-market that has it all.

419 N Bishop Ave
Dallas,
TX
US

It was 1974. Jim Atkinson and Wick Allison had recently graduated from the University of Texas and were inspired to communicate with Dallas via an independent city magazine. They worked late into the evening as Allison attended graduate school, developing story ideas and reaching out to local businesspeople for financial backing. After they connected with Stanley Marcus of Neiman Marcus fame, the retailer recommended D magazine to his 200,000 cardholders. Demand shot up instantly, and they hadn't even printed the first issue. As the candid editorial content and assertive tone of D magazine gained attention, it also attracted heavy criticism. Atkinson and Allison relied on honest journalistic methods to inspire and provoke their readers. And though the editorial team's commitment to addressing controversial issues soon drove away less-than-stalwart sponsors, the magazine continued to gain support from its readers. After relocating to New York and founding Art & Antiques—the world's largest circulated art and antiques magazine thanks to its subscriber base and the 72-point font text used in every article—Allison returned to D Magazine in 1995 to continue delving into the rich culture of Dallas and Fort Worth.

750 N Saint Paul St
Dallas,
TX
US

Nestled inside a cozy vintage cottage, the award-winning Shabby Sheep swaths learners in handmade fibers and local artists’ knitting knowledge. In the Quick Start Knit classes small groups unravel needlework basics such as casting on, binding off, and wrestling yarn balls from clawing lemurs. During the course of 90 minutes students discover how to craft snowman-ready scarves and other rectangular objects. Crocheters practice the stitches that bind lace and doilies, learning to wield hooks with the grace of a pirate ballerina. Participants leave with new needle-working know-how as well as a tight-knit group of friends, eager to return to The Shabby Sheep for future shopping trips and stitching socials.

2110 Boll St
Dallas,
TX
US

In Deep Ellum, Elm Street isn't just home to scary, razor-wielding men in striped shirts. At Slaughterhouse, creatures, frights, and disturbed murderers coexist in 16,000 square feet of twisting paths and dark corners. For more than a decade, they've opened their doors during the Halloween season, as well as key days throughout the year, such as St. Patrick's Day weekend or the day a ghost decides to retire.

2615 Elm St.
Dallas,
TX
US

While most air-and-space museums house aircraft retired after extensive service, the centerpiece of the collection at the Frontiers of Flight Museum has a flight record that’s hard to match: 163 consecutive orbits around Earth. Between October 11 and 22, 1968, the Apollo 7 command module rocketed around the globe at 17,280 miles per hour, chalking up a healthy number of orbits before splashing into the Atlantic and, eventually, coming to its current residence on the museum floor. Displayed with its hatch open for visitors to peep inside at its instrument-covered panels, the module sits alongside thousands of artifacts from the various golden ages of aeronautic exploration, including salvage from the infamous Hindenburg airship and more than 30 vintage aircraft. The family-friendly museum welcomes younger visitors with the Children’s Discovery Area and a "living history" series featuring aviation icons such as Amelia Earhart and Orville Wright.

6911 Lemmon Avenue
Dallas,
TX
US