Arts & Entertainment in Victory Park

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It was 1974. Jim Atkinson and Wick Allison had recently graduated from the University of Texas and were inspired to communicate with Dallas via an independent city magazine. They worked late into the evening as Allison attended graduate school, developing story ideas and reaching out to local businesspeople for financial backing. After they connected with Stanley Marcus of Neiman Marcus fame, the retailer recommended D magazine to his 200,000 cardholders. Demand shot up instantly, and they hadn't even printed the first issue. As the candid editorial content and assertive tone of D magazine gained attention, it also attracted heavy criticism. Atkinson and Allison relied on honest journalistic methods to inspire and provoke their readers. And though the editorial team's commitment to addressing controversial issues soon drove away less-than-stalwart sponsors, the magazine continued to gain support from its readers. After relocating to New York and founding Art & Antiques—the world's largest circulated art and antiques magazine thanks to its subscriber base and the 72-point font text used in every article—Allison returned to D Magazine in 1995 to continue delving into the rich culture of Dallas and Fort Worth.

750 N Saint Paul St
Dallas,
TX
US

Nestled inside a cozy vintage cottage, the award-winning Shabby Sheep swaths learners in handmade fibers and local artists’ knitting knowledge. In the Quick Start Knit classes small groups unravel needlework basics such as casting on, binding off, and wrestling yarn balls from clawing lemurs. During the course of 90 minutes students discover how to craft snowman-ready scarves and other rectangular objects. Crocheters practice the stitches that bind lace and doilies, learning to wield hooks with the grace of a pirate ballerina. Participants leave with new needle-working know-how as well as a tight-knit group of friends, eager to return to The Shabby Sheep for future shopping trips and stitching socials.

2110 Boll St
Dallas,
TX
US

In Deep Ellum, Elm Street isn't just home to scary, razor-wielding men in striped shirts. At Slaughterhouse, creatures, frights, and disturbed murderers coexist in 16,000 square feet of twisting paths and dark corners. For more than a decade, they've opened their doors during the Halloween season, as well as key days throughout the year, such as St. Patrick's Day weekend or the day a ghost decides to retire.

2615 Elm St.
Dallas,
TX
US

Nest's comfy coffers are stocked with the latest in designer home furnishings for beds, baths, and beyonds, offering home décor, furniture, seating, and children's furnishings from vendors based in Italy and New York. Build up your soap's sagging self-esteem by giving him a home in a lavish oyster soap dish ($35), dress color-starved desktops with a Mondrian stationery box ($145), or keep track of auctioneering appointments in textured croc-style personal pocket journals ($38). Nest can also help elegantly illuminate alleyways with slender stick lighters ($33) and python iPad sleeves stylishly hold computer tablets so bowlers can speed-read Weight Training for Bowling in between rolls ($125).

4524 McKinney Ave
Dallas,
TX
US

Celebrating 14 years in business, Good Records playfully deems itself as ?an adventure in listening??a spot-on assessment given the store?s eclectic selection of music. Yet, the adventure here isn?t just about digging for vinyl. Nearly every week, a local act, such as Light Horse Harry and Howler Jr., Baptist Generals, and Ishi, takes over the Good Records stage, inundating the spot with live sounds and scaring away any wandering coyotes. It?s the perfect backdrop for perusing new and used LPs from seemingly every genre, including albums from Journey and Black Sabbath, as well as the latest by Vampire Weekend, Snoop Dog, and Cat Power.

1808 Greenville Ave
Dallas,
TX
US

The Bishop Street Market sits on the corner of the trendy Bishop Art’s District neighborhood and beckons the passerby to come on in. On the outside there is a country scene painting that adorns the large brick wall. Inside, there is everything from home products to jewelry, to unusual gifts that are hard to find anywhere else. Folks come from miles around to find just the right card for any occasion. Don’t expect just another market either, Bishop Street Market still offers complimentary gift wrapping or free gift bags and tissue for the last minute shopper. Another stand-out out is the art by well-known artist Austin James, the store sells everything from his crosses to large wall hangings. This is one street-market that has it all.

419 N Bishop Ave
Dallas,
TX
US