Sightseeing in Darby

Uncover an Abandoned Gold Mine Hidden Under the City

Historical Walking Tour

Valley Green Inn

$20 $20

Urban explorer John Vidumsky leads you to a forgotten gold mine inside Philadelphia's city limits and reveals its wild history

Savor Regional Chinese Cuisine in a Chinatown Walking Tour

Jamie Shanker

Philadelphia

$45 $45

Try an eclectic variety of foods from various regions of China during a walking tour led by food writer Jamie Shanker

Stay at Sheraton Philadelphia University City Hotel in Philadelphia. Dates Available into November.

Sheraton Philadelphia University City Hotel

Philadelphia

$125 $125

(2007)

Sheraton hotel in the heart of University City between UPenn and Drexel University; features onsite noodle house and an outdoor pool

75-Minute Spirits of ’76 Ghost Tour or Constitutional Walking Tour of Philadelphia for Two (51% Off)

The Constitutional Walking Tour

Multiple Locations

$35 $17

(46)

Guides lead the way through more than 20 sites tied to ghost stories and folklore or the city’s role in the American Revolution

Haunted House Adventure for Two or Four at Fright Factory (Up to 52% Off)

Fright Factory

Philadelphia

$60 $29

(16)

Travel through an insane asylum, a genetics lab, a mausoleum, and a look at the true nature of fear at one of America’s scariest attractions

Oktoberfest Halloween & Haunted Tavern Tour for Two or Four from Grim Philly (Up to 52% Off)

Grim Philly

Center City East

$79.98 $38

(26)

Guides use adult-only language to tell spooky stories about Philly's haunted history as groups visit taverns; includes drinks and prizes

Visit for One, Two, or Four to The Franklin Institute (Up to 46% Off)

The Franklin Institute

The Franklin Institute

$18.50 $10

(969)

Explore interactive exhibits that uncover the secrets of the brain, history's greatest inventions, and the biology and physics of the circus

Admission for Two Adults or Two Adults and Three Children to Shofuso Japanese House & Garden (Up to 45% Off)

Shofuso Japanese House & Garden

Fairmount Park

$29 $16

(25)

Traditional-style Japanese house and garden features koi pond and structures, showcasing the history of Japanese culture in Philadelphia

Food Tour for One or Two from Chew Philly Food Tours (Up to 53% Off)

Chew Philly Food Tours

Manayunk

$74 $36

(213)

Groups taste cheesesteaks, tomato pie & other Philly specialties at six family-owned establishments & guides offer historical facts

Philadelphia History Museum Visit for Two or Four Adults (Up to 45% Off)

Philadelphia History Museum

Center City East

$20 $12

Opened in 1941, the museum showcases more than 100,000 artifacts, including George Washington's writing desk and Joe Frazier's boxing gloves

Hop-On, Hop-Off Tour and Franklin Footstep Tour for One or Two with Philadelphia Trolley Works (Up to 37% Off)

Philadelphia Trolley Works

Grays Ferry

$51 $32

London-styled double-decker busses rove to sites such as the Liberty Bell, the LOVE sculpture, and the Betsy Ross House

Select Local Merchants

Philadelphia Theatre Company is a dramatic laboratory for new stage works. Since its founding in 1974, the company has premiered more than 140 original plays and musicals, with more than half moving on to New York and other major cities. Widely lauded by local outlets and frequently recognized with Barrymore Awards, the company would need to build a new black box theater to contain its accolades.

480 S Broad St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Sensory overload doesn?t begin to describe Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens. A seemingly boundless compilation of colors, textures, and shapes, the labyrinthine mosaic creation spans 3,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space. The masterpiece originated in the brain of Isaiah Zagar, a Philadelphia native who grew up in New York. During his third year of art school, he stumbled upon Clarence Schmidt?s folk-art-inspired installations?assemblages of found objects and recycled materials?and the young artist?s view of the art world changed. ?I didn't know that I was looking at art,? Zagar reflects in his mission statement. Self-admittedly, Zagar has been somewhat ?copying? Schmidt?s dynamic, free-flowing style ever since.

The years after art school brought Zagar an onslaught of new opportunities. He spent time as an artist in China and India, joined the Peace Corps with his wife Julia, settled in Peru for three years, and even tried his hand at ceramics in Wisconsin. In the ?60s, he and Julia returned to his birthplace?specifically, the waning South Street neighborhood. Isaiah quickly leapt into action, renovating dilapidated buildings and often adding mosaics to formerly barren walls. Eventually, Isaiah?s imagination outgrew their projects, and in 1994 he began constructing a new piece in a vacant lot near his studio?the project would become Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens.

Isaiah spent 14 precious years, which he should have applied to Y2K preparations, scooping out tunnels, erecting multitiered walls, and splashing the entire space in colorful tile. The finished product stretches across half a block of South Street; the outside enclosure shimmering with vibrant tiles, the inside housing folk art, colored glass bottles, and countless sparkling mirrors. Now a nonprofit organization, Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens invites visitors to enjoy its visual candy with guided or self-guided tours.

1020 South St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

When Samuel Vaughan Merrick and William H. Keating brought The Franklin Institute to life in 1824, it was to honor the life and achievements of Renaissance man Benjamin Franklin. In the decades since, the Institute has hosted further forward thinkers such as Nikola Tesla, who demonstrated wireless telegraphy in 1893, and helped advance science and technology, hosting the first public demo of an all-electronic TV system in 1934.

  • Size: three floors give voice to human ingenuity?past and future?with hundreds of interactive exhibits
  • Eye Catcher: the two-story-tall, 5,000-square-foot Giant Heart, which teaches children about cardiovascular health while they crawl through its chambers
  • Permanent Mainstay: Fels Planetarium, the second oldest planetarium in the nation, complete with a rooftop observatory and a 60-foot seamless aluminum dome
  • Hands-On Experiments: construct an interplanetary rover in the Space Command, complete an electrical circuit with your body, and launch a cannonball in Circus! Science Under the Big Top
  • Honor the Man: swing by the 20-foot-tall, 30-ton marble statue of Benjamin Franklin in the rotunda to see what the genius looked like and thank him for your bifocals
  • Don't Miss: the Maillardet Automaton, a boy-like drawing machine that inspired the film Hugo
222 North 20th St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US

The National Museum of American Jewish History's core exhibition traces more than 350 years of American Jewish history, documenting their triumphs and struggles since first settling in 1654. Spread across 25,000 square feet on five floors, the exhibition's historical objects and lifelike environments cover subjects such as the late 19th-century Jewish immigration and the involvement of American Jews in the Civil Rights Movement. As the exhibition moves into the present day, visitors can share their own stories and opinions in two of the museum's interactive stations: It's Your Story and the Contemporary Issues Forum. After sharing their own journeys, guests can explore the Only in America Gallery/Hall of Fame, where multimedia displays and original artifacts highlight the lives of prominent Jewish Americans, including Irving Berlin and Est?e Lauder.

Cups of Old City Coffee, baked goods from LeBus, and vegetarian and dairy cuisine from Di Bruno Bros. reenergize museum-goers at the Pomegranates Caf?; kosher fare is also available. Additional museum programming includes educational opportunities for adults and kids, as well as live events such as lectures, discussions, and concerts.

101 S Independence Mall E
Philadelphia,
PA
US

Owner Nancy Nagle stocks a colorful rainbow of knitting supplies in her bright and eccentric gallery, which has become a go-to outlet for the local knitting community. To meet the demand, she constantly stuffs her shelves with new styles of material, ranging from traditional yarns to luxury fibers—banana, recycled silk, and Wookiee fur—to carry-along yarns with sequins, flags, and lash. Nagle’s passion for fiber arts has introduced her to a community of artists who dye and spin some of her more than 20 brands of yarn. She uses the shop as a gallery to display the work of these local artists—including Philadelphia native John Stango—as well as share her own bold collection of woven work such as hats, shawls, and sweaters.

City Paper's A.D. Amorosi describes the two-floor Nangellini as a "doubly colorful" space as "bright and open as a bay window in Sag Harbor." Amorosi admires the gallery's art collection, and between the vibrant space's "faux-tin ceiling" and "matronly rugs," Nancy leads open and privately scheduled classes on knitting, crochet, and lace work. Classes cover all the basic techniques required for newcomers to begin creating their own woven pieces, such as scarves and felt toupees.

832 South St
Philadelphia,
PA
US

It's more than a collection of exhibits, galleries, and glass works?though it's all of those things, too. Above and beyond housing art, the National Liberty Museum aims to serve as a mirror to the unique kaleidoscope that is the United States. Visitors to the museum explore eight galleries, each organized to highlight a particular aspect of what it means to be American. Liberty Hall, for instance, houses a selection of White House fine china alongside medals awarded to members of the armed services, while Heroes Hall showcases glass sculptor Dale Chihuly's massive Flame of Liberty installation in celebration of brave individuals.

Regardless of how visitors tackle the museum?although they should never tackle it literally, due to the high volume of glass?they'll likely find themselves intrigued by the thought-provoking collection. When Irvin J. Borowsky founded the museum in 1995, he did so with just this intent, seeking to inspire others to pursue more peaceful lives. But Borowsky may never have envisioned the scale it would one day reach: 78 exhibits, 179 works of contemporary art, and thousands of stories vividly told.

321 Chestnut St
Philadelphia,
PA
US