Sightseeing in Detroit


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SemSeg's Segway experts equip urban explorers to cruise through Detroit at up to 12.5 miles per hour during self-guided tours. A brief orientation covers proper techniques for turning, stopping, and impromptu jousting. Then, motorists hop aboard scooters and travel up to 24 miles on a single charge. The long battery life allows motorists to cruise down the Riverfront, circle 14-acre Hart Plaza, and crisscross the Rivard Plaza in a single trip. Though SemSeg encourages DIY tours, their guides lead weekend tours through downtown and down the Riverwalk.
1938 Franklin Street
Detroit,
MI
US
For an art museum, the flat, cracked facade of the Museum of Contemporary Art Detroit (MOCAD) is shockingly stark, yet there's beauty in its realness. The walls that once framed an abandoned car dealership now host Barry McGee's "Untitled" mural of writ-large graffiti on the building's exterior, greeting people with an uncompromising sense of honesty that permeates through to the art collection within. MOCAD's informal approach to art exhibition shares a kindred spirit with few other museums, with exhibits that swap museum-imposed artifice for relatable, raw beauty. That didn't go unnoticed by The New York Times, who hailed the collection for "seeing the seediness, and celebrating it." Never straying from a mission to present contemporary works that reflect the current culture, inspire dialogue, and engage the community, MOCAD's stunning exhibitions narrate the history and future of the Motor City. Public programs such as lectures, literary readings, live music performances, films, and children's educational activities further engage visitors, and the MOCAD store offers exclusive t-shirts, magazines, kid's toys, and jewelry.
4454 Woodward Ave.
Detroit,
MI
US
Don't settle for an inferior brew! The java at Fourteen East Cafe will perk you right up. Low-fat fare is not available here, so leave some room in your diet. Fourteen East Cafe is kid-friendly, so little ones are welcome to tag along. Get your whole crew together at Fourteen East Cafe, offering lots of special space for larger parties. Need to catch up on some work or the latest news? Get online at Fourteen East Cafe with their complimentary wifi. No need for a wardrobe change when you hit Fourteen East Cafe — it's strictly casual. Fourteen East Cafe can also cater your next party; call today for details. You can also grab your food to go. Sidle into a space on the street or park your vehicle in the adjacent lot. You won't get sticker shock from your bill at Fourteen East Cafe — prices are usually less than $15. You can pay with Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express or any major credit card.
15 E Kirby St
Detroit,
MI
US
More than 100 years ago, the Ford Piquette Avenue Plant was on the cutting edge of innovation?the first 12,000 Model Ts were made on its premises. But over the years, the "Birthplace of the Model T" was neglected, and in 1997, afraid that the bulldozers were lurking around the corner, ready to raze the premises, a committee was formed to investigate saving the plant. The Model T Automotive Heritage Complex purchased the New England?mill-style structure two years later, transforming it into an auto museum and National Historic Landmark. Today, the museum is one of the oldest automotive plants open to the public in the city of Detroit. The venue?s exhibits chronicle not only Ford?s rise to the forefront of the automotive industry, but also lesser known tales. Visitors can learn about other car models built there, such as the Model N, and about other automakers, such as Wayne and Brush.
461 Piquette Ave.
Detroit,
MI
US
In 1986, artist Tyree Guyton began painting abandoned houses, arranging found objects into sculptures, and decorating abandoned cars on a two-block stretch of Heidelberg Street on the city’s east end. The Heidelberg Project, as the undertaking came to be known, is a commentary on urban decay and remains just as impactful decades after its inception.
42 Watson St
Detroit,
MI
US
As a response to the deterioration of the neighborhood where he was raised, artist Tyree Guyton conceived of this outdoor art installation in 1986. Made almost entirely of found objects, it’s a fun and whimsical wonderland that’s sure to spark conversations with kids about what art really is. Interactive art in the form of a small playground stands on the northwest corner.
3600 Heidelberg Street
Detroit,
MI
US
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