Museums in Dickson


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On the evening of November 30, 1864, the town of Franklin, Tennessee, bore witness to more than five hours of carnage as Confederate forces under the command of General John Bell Hood assaulted an entrenched corps of Federal troops led by General John M. Schofield. The heaviest fighting entailed a frontal attack on the Federal lines—incorporating about 20,000 soldiers on each side, or more soldiers than Pickett's Charge at the Battle of Gettysburg. General Hood hoped this attack would dislodge the Federal forces and that he would be able to eventually recapture Nashville. Over the course of the next five hours, this charge resulted in a staggering number of casualties and General Schofield steadily withdrew his forces toward Nashville, leaving behind a battle-scarred town as well as a battered Confederate force. Today, the Battle of Franklin Trust allows visitors to learn more about this key battle by visiting and taking guided tours of several sites that played integral roles in the events that took place on and around November 30, 1864. The Carter House served as the command post for General Jacob D. Cox, a Federal officer tasked with overseeing the construction of defensive positions as the Confederate forces advanced. These defenses were constructed within 300 feet of the home, and guests have the opportunity to explore the grounds as well as the home, including the basement where the Carter family and roughly two dozen civilians sought shelter from the battle being fought outside their doors. One of those civilians was Albert Lotz, whose own home still stands 110 steps away from the Carter residence. The Lotz House bears its own battle scars, too, including a charred indentation in the wood flooring that was caused by an errant cannonball. Located one mile away from the two houses, the McGavock family's Carnton Plantation also welcomes guests, providing them with tours of the site that served as the area's largest field hospital after the fighting ceased. The plantation features two acres of land that the McGavocks offered as the final burial site for approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers who died at the Battle of Franklin, making it the largest privately owned military cemetery in the nation.
1140 Columbia Avenue
Franklin,
TN
US
Started as the road-baby brainchild of Jeff Lane from his private collection, the Lane Motor Museum is now 40,000 square feet and displays more than 150 cars and motorcycles in showroom quality or near-original specifications. Specializing in exotic European cars, the collection is arranged by country and showcases vehicles from Europe, Asia, the Galilean moons, and North and South America. Visitors can stroll through the museum, formerly the Sunbeam Bakery, and view microcars, amphibious road swimmers, military machines, alternative fuel vehicles, and yeast cars with biscuit wheels that only run in temperatures more than 100 degrees. Open from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Thursday through Monday, the Lane Motor Museum features an enthusiast-worthy collection of antique, exotic, retro, ethereal, unusual, and sometimes downright bizarre automobiles sure to entertain guests of all ages.
702 Murfreesboro Pike
Nashville,
TN
US
A log cabin sits huddled in the woods as breezes sway rolling grasses and flowerbeds across the 1,120 acres that surround it. A Federal-style mansion stands tall against the sky, its columns flanking a towering front door and presidential balcony. Carrying on a 200-year tradition, The Hermitage tells the story of the presidential family, its plantation's slave population, and the atmosphere of the time through 32 historic buildings and more than a dozen archaeological sites. The mansion and visitor center boast 3,000 original objects and 800,000 archaeological artifacts on display, as well as 1,200 printed items, 3,000 photographs, and 800 manuscripts bearing the president's original handwriting and cappuccino stains. The mansion's Greek-revival woodwork and mantels frame original wallpaper, and glass cases hold Andrew Jackson's authentic glasses, slippers, top hats, swords, and canes. Inside the visitor center, the Jacksons' actual private carriage guards a hallway leading to collections of artifacts from the plantation's slave families and communities. Most items in the collections were purchased directly from the Jackson family, though many artifacts were uncovered in the late 1800s by the historic Ladies' Hermitage Association when they broke ground for a new Olympic-sized swimming pool. On the outdoor grounds, trained guides usher visitors to the first Hermitage, a log cabin where the Jackson family lived while the mansion was being built, and Alfred's Cabin, the preserved 1840s quarters of the former groundskeeper. In the garden, winding trails take visitors past period plants and the Grecian-style tombs of Andrew and Rachel Jackson. The rest of The Hermitage's grounds contain a network of winding walking trails, as well as grassy areas and cabins where museum staffers host events, weddings, and birthday parties. Across the grounds, interpreters in authentic period dress direct visitors to the sites of historic events and often train grade-school students to do the same through the center's special school programs.
4580 Rachels Lane
Nashville,
TN
US
Operated by the nonprofit Country Music Foundation, this monument to the genre’s local and international history honors inductees—including the inaugural trio of Jimmie Rodgers, Hank Williams and Fred Rose—with bronze plaques in a vast rotunda. The core permanent exhibit, Sing Me Back Home: A Journey Through Country Music, traces country from its pre-commercial roots in the 19th century to its current place in the entertainment industry with hallmarks such as photos, original recordings, and 10-gallon hats still filled with whiskey. On the packed event calendar, a quarterly Poets and Prophets series honors legendary songwriters, and weekly instrument demonstrations reveal artists' deft finger work. At the onsite Frist Library and Archive, patrons can explore more than four decades of historical media, from fan-club newsletters to Johnny Cash's amateur photographs of dogs dressed in striped prison jumpsuits.
222 5th Ave S
Nashville,
TN
US
Founded as the Union Gospel Tabernacle by steamboat captain Thomas Ryman after an angel got trapped in his smokestack, the Ryman Auditorium has since become a different kind of hallowed ground, lovingly referred to as the "mother church of country music." The Grand Ole Opry and The Johnny Cash Show have both taken residence among its wooden pews, and the twanged voices of country legends such as Hank Williams and Patsy Cline have reverberated off the stenciled artwork on the face of the balcony. Today, the venue plays host to a variety of acts, from rock concerts to television specials to comedy shows.
116 5th Avenue North
Nashville,
TN
US
Sporting an AAA Gem rating?an honor only bestowed upon six Nashville attractions?the Johnny Cash Museum honors the life, work, and legend of one of American music's most iconic figures. The mythology of the Man in Black comes to life through a collection of the musician's personal memorabilia, bringing guests into contact with the music and lyrics that reshaped country music for generations of fans. Curated by lifelong fan and owner Bill Miller, the collection has earned plaudits from outlets ranging from CNN and the New York Times to Billboard and Vogue, with National Geographic's placing it at the top of their list of Pitch-Perfect Museums. Focus: the instruments, writings, and personal effects of music legend Johnny Cash Latest Exhibit: The Legends of Sun Records, detailing Cash's connections with labelmates like Elvis, Roy Orbison, and Jerry Lee Lewis Permanent Mainstay: Cash's original 1959 Gibson J-200 guitar Eye-Catcher: the suit that Cash wore when he performed at the White House in 1971 Don't Miss: handwritten artifacts, including the original lyrics to "I Walk The Line" and love letters between Cash and his wives
119 3rd Ave. S
Nashville,
TN
US
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