Interior Design in District of Columbia

Select Local Merchants

Moving into a brand-new space is like purchasing 10 bags of vegetables at a farmer's market: if you don't know what you're going to do next, your efforts will rot like a 10-month-old banana abandoned in the pantry. Red House can help. Catering to young professionals, they specialize in creating contemporary and comfortable living arrangements and have experience working with all types of spaces, from cabins to condominiums. Owner Lyric Turner's expertise as a real-estate agent prompted her to launch the creative consulting service, and either she or a member of her team will devote special time to your special place. Buy an extra one for a passive-aggressive gift for a friend who still lives like a college student or your boyfriend who still sleeps on the floor.

175 R St NE
Washington,
DC
US

Tabletop stocks everything you might put on a tabletop, plus decorative accessories, jewelry, purses and kids’ stuff. The shop, located in a Dupont Circle townhouse, is immense, with several sections filled with whimsical, yet practical and functional items. Just inside the entrance, jewelry display cases sits next to a showroom packed with goods any interior designer would go ga-ga over. In the back of the store sit the tabletop items, along with tableware, cookbooks, cooking implements and cooking vessels. There is also a section completely devoted to kids. Even if you aren’t in the mood to buy, Tabletop is a great place to pick up gift ideas.

1608 20th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Locals come to Wake Up Little Suzie from all over the city to find unique gifts that are either playful, retro, wacky – or all of the above. You can find stuff you never knew you wanted inside the slightly cluttered but decidedly friendly storefront, from unique animal plush toys to robot-shaped clocks. There are also practical items like tableware, greeting cards and pretty candle holders, much of which is made by hand. Wake Up Little Suzie also offers a nice assortment of creative jewelry and kitchen accessories, both served up with just a touch of whimsy. It’s also a good place to pick up colorful and one-of-a-kind gifts for kids and pets.

3409 Connecticut Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Good Wood is an emporium, an antique store and a furniture store all wrapped up into one, but most of all, it’s funky. The atmosphere is reminiscent of a Western mercantile and dry good shop, and there’s even a buck head attached to the wall. However, they don’t sell western wear. In fact, the small line of clothing currently has more of an Eastern bent, with kimonos being the prime product. There are also gift goodies like soaps, perfumes, wallets and jewelry. But Good Wood is best known as a vintage furniture store, offering a well-curated range of tables, chairs, sofas and chests.

1428 U St NW
Washington,
DC
US

While the Georgetown outpost of national retail chain Anthropologie carries the usual home furnishings, baubles, bits of jewelry and clothing as their brethren across the country, the shop does manage to retain a very local feel. You’d even be forgiven for confusing the three-level space with one of the many upscale Georgetown townhouses nearby. The first level is cozy and intimate, and after perusing a small selection of accessories and clothing, you can wander down the stairs, via a mezzanine, to the basement space below. This lower, larger area seems to go on and on, stocked high with women’s clothing, home goods and items for the boudoir that range from lingerie to bedroom basics. Unlike some other Anthro outlets, this one even stocks shoes, and is known for their fabulous sales.

3222 M St NW
Washington,
DC
US

The staffers at The Frame Shop, KH Art Lorton, and Art & Framing Studio of Kingstowne stock top-quality Larson-Juhl moldings in a spectrum of thicknesses, materials, and colors. To fit mats to these frames, the staffers cut them with precise tools such as Wizard International machines and dangerously sharp yardsticks. Their techniques include cutting v-grooves into mats and matching eye-catching glass with eco-friendly framing materials.

300 D St
Washington,
DC
US