Sightseeing in Drexel Hill


Select Local Merchants

The winner of seven consecutive Best Custom Framing awards from CityVoter users, Masterpieces Fine Art & Custom Framing stocks more than 2,300 frames, including work by industry mainstay Larson-Juhl. Its skilled framers meld function and aesthetic form to secure works of art in everything from American hardwood to 22-karat-gold-leafing frames to metal handcuffs. Aside from framing, the staff also restores faded or creased photos to their original vivid states and brings photos to life by converting them into imitation oil paintings or watercolors that look like they were born from hours of meticulous brushstrokes.
3547 W Chester Pike
Newtown Square,
PA
US
You shouldn't judge a book by its cover, but judging the Athenaeum of Philadelphia by its facade wouldn't lead you too far astray, either. Designed in 1845 by architect John Notman, it's an iconic example of Italian Revival style architecture, and one of the first Philadelphia buildings built from brownstone. Perhaps most relevantly, it's also a National Historic Landmark?and inside, you'll find a fittingly historic collection of tomes on architecture, interior design, and other topics. Some are housed here as artifacts, others as reference materials. Anyone who wants to take in the latter can do so while kicking back in the space's large reading rooms, whose 24-foot ceilings are ideal for anyone with an interest in history or in possession of a two-story book.
219 S 6th St
Philadelphia,
PA
US
At the heart of Chemical Heritage Foundation is a single thesis: chemistry changed the world. Expanding on that notion is the permanent exhibit Making Modernity, which covers alchemy, synthetics, electrochemistry, and beyond. Looking at rare books, personal papers from prominent scientists, and fancy-looking apparatuses, visitors will find a renewed appreciation for carbon, hydrogen, and all their other favorite elements.
315 Chestnut Street
Philadelphia,
PA
US
Sensory overload doesn?t begin to describe Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens. A seemingly boundless compilation of colors, textures, and shapes, the labyrinthine mosaic creation spans 3,000 square feet of indoor and outdoor space. The masterpiece originated in the brain of Isaiah Zagar, a Philadelphia native who grew up in New York. During his third year of art school, he stumbled upon Clarence Schmidt?s folk-art-inspired installations?assemblages of found objects and recycled materials?and the young artist?s view of the art world changed. ?I didn't know that I was looking at art,? Zagar reflects in his mission statement. Self-admittedly, Zagar has been somewhat ?copying? Schmidt?s dynamic, free-flowing style ever since. The years after art school brought Zagar an onslaught of new opportunities. He spent time as an artist in China and India, joined the Peace Corps with his wife Julia, settled in Peru for three years, and even tried his hand at ceramics in Wisconsin. In the ?60s, he and Julia returned to his birthplace?specifically, the waning South Street neighborhood. Isaiah quickly leapt into action, renovating dilapidated buildings and often adding mosaics to formerly barren walls. Eventually, Isaiah?s imagination outgrew their projects, and in 1994 he began constructing a new piece in a vacant lot near his studio?the project would become Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens. Isaiah spent 14 precious years, which he should have applied to Y2K preparations, scooping out tunnels, erecting multitiered walls, and splashing the entire space in colorful tile. The finished product stretches across half a block of South Street; the outside enclosure shimmering with vibrant tiles, the inside housing folk art, colored glass bottles, and countless sparkling mirrors. Now a nonprofit organization, Philadelphia?s Magic Gardens invites visitors to enjoy its visual candy with guided or self-guided tours.
1020 South St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US
The Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts (PAFA) celebrates art from America's entire history. Its galleries take visitors on a chronological trip through the country's ever-changing aesthetic landscape, with special attention paid to sculptures, paintings, and paper works. Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts also trains the next generation of artists, with full-time degree programs at the bachelor and masters levels. Size: two buildings?The Historic Landmark Building and the contemporary Samuel M.V. Hamilton Building Eye Catcher: Gilbert Stuart?s 1796 painting George Washington (The Lansdowne Portrait) Permanent Mainstay: Gallery 128, which showcases a rotating collection of works from current students, alumni, and faculty Visiting Exhibit: Spiritual Strivings: A Celebration of African American Works on Paper, which encompasses more than 90 works (through October 12, 2014) Don't Miss: Highway?George Tooker's 1953 painting depicting the challenges of living in New York City Pro Tip: artists can bring a sketchbook (pencil only) into the the Historic Landmark Building, provided it doesn't exceed 12? x 16? or erupt with trumpet fanfares when opened Special Programs: art-history lectures, evening gallery events, and continuing-education programs in drawing, painting, sculpture, and other mediums
118 N Broad St.
Philadelphia,
PA
US
When Samuel Vaughan Merrick and William H. Keating brought The Franklin Institute to life in 1824, it was to honor the life and achievements of Renaissance man Benjamin Franklin. In the decades since, the Institute has hosted further forward thinkers such as Nikola Tesla, who demonstrated wireless telegraphy in 1893, and helped advance science and technology, hosting the first public demo of an all-electronic TV system in 1934. Size: three floors give voice to human ingenuity?past and future?with hundreds of interactive exhibits Eye Catcher: the two-story-tall, 5,000-square-foot Giant Heart, which teaches children about cardiovascular health while they crawl through its chambers Permanent Mainstay: Fels Planetarium, the second oldest planetarium in the nation, complete with a rooftop observatory and a 60-foot seamless aluminum dome Hands-On Experiments: construct an interplanetary rover in the Space Command, complete an electrical circuit with your body, and launch a cannonball in Circus! Science Under the Big Top Honor the Man: swing by the 20-foot-tall, 30-ton marble statue of Benjamin Franklin in the rotunda to see what the genius looked like and thank him for your bifocals Don't Miss: the Maillardet Automaton, a boy-like drawing machine that inspired the film Hugo
222 North 20th Street
Philadelphia,
PA
US
Advertisement