Moroccan Restaurants in East New York


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Kif pleases palates with a selection of tasty tapas and traditional homemade Moroccan entrees. Enliven a night out with friends or accentuate a surprise party for your pet tongue with a small plate such as falafel on Dekalb, a charming conglomeration of crushed chickpeas and Moroccan spices with harissa aioli ($6), or merguez, a savory selection of spicy lamb sausage lounging on a bed of marinated tomatoes ($6). For entrees, quell carnivorous cravings with steak frites, a prime skirt-steak plate paired with french fries on a bed of avocado sprinkled in red onion vinaigrette ($18), or relish the lamb shank tagine, an organic meatsperience confettied in tagine spices and green peas with a side of couscous ($23).

219 Dekalb Ave
Brooklyn,
NY
US

Influenced by both the Mediterranean and North Africa, Moroccan cuisine is marked by a heavy use of lamb, fragrant spices, and the French tenacity for complex cooking methods. Moroccan-born Yassir Raouli shares his take on his home country’s cooking through both a mobile bistro truck and a sedentary restaurant. He infuses his own creative aesthetic into dishes, adding duck bacon to the lamb burger and filling popovers with melty gruyere cheese. This playfulness is seen across the brunch, lunch, and dinner menus, along with an unwavering dedication to wholesome, organic ingredients obtained from small-scale farmers. The restaurant suggests all dishes be shared.

124 Ridge St
New York,
NY
US

Explore the endless flavors of Mediterranean fare at Bistro Lamazou in Kips Bay. The menu at Bistro Lamazou does not include any low-fat options, so come ready to indulge. Bistro Lamazou also operates a bar, so a round of drinks with dinner is not out of the question. Have a big celebration coming up? Consider the private room at Bistro Lamazou, perfect for large groups of revelers.

Place an order for pickup or schedule a delivery — the restaurant makes it easy to enjoy your meal from anywhere. Love the food so much you want to serve it at your next soiree? No problem — Bistro Lamazou offers catering.

Bistro Lamazou patrons can find street parking at the 3rd Avenue location.

Prices are affordable, with a typical meal running under $30. Breakfast, lunch, and dinner are all served at the restaurant, but the dinner menu is the real standout.

344 3rd Avenue
New York,
NY
US

One look at the circuitous journey Tagine's Head Chef Hamid Idrissi took to get to where he is today, and it's no surprise that he's most attracted to the "rustic, labor-intensive" quality of Moroccan food. Starting his adult life as a barister in Northern Morocco, the reluctant lawyer started spending more and more of his time coordinating elaborate dinner parties for friends. Perhaps he wanted to reclaim part of a childhood spent helping his mother prepare feasts, often for upwards of a hundred family members and friends. In those early days?which acted as an de facto apprenticeship?he learned from her how to balance Berber and Arabic flavors, discovering the subtle interactions of orange blossom water, cardamom, and mint. He also familiarized himself with the tools of the trade, working with massive earthenware pots and hand-welded copper pans.

Even after 30 years in New York City, and years spent working his way up from line cook, he still finds that the flavors of his native Morocco suit him best. His passion for his culinary tradition is such that he often waxes poetical about the ingredients during his in-restaurant cooking classes. He expounds on the versatility of olive oil, which can enrich his signature Moroccan pheasant pie or add flavor to his homemade semolina bread. He elaborates on the virtues of roasted garlic, preserved lemon, and the rewards of doing the hard work of cooking yourself. That mindset is why he makes everything in house, from encasing his own lamb merguez sausages to enfolding sweets within fresh pastry dough. He also takes a hands-on role with drink preparation, and recommends the orange blossom sangria, also designed in his kitchen, to wash down the carefully crafted meals

Just as Chef Hamid's menu showcases the traditions of his homeland, the decor of his restaurant highlights the many artforms that surrounded him as he grew up. He bedecks the walls in handwoven berber textiles, and lights the soft space with the colored glass Moroccan lamps. Belly dancers sinuously wend their way through the dining room. Even the hookah pipes are works of art, the flavorful smoke emerging from colored glass bulbs just as genies emerge from the tailpipes of Toyota Celicas every 150,000 miles to grant wishes.

221 W 38 St.
Manhattan,
NY
US

If fine food and refreshing beverages are on your to-do list, check out Cafe Gitane in New York. Cafe Gitane is a fantastic spot to indulge and with no low-fat options, you'll need to save the diet for another day. Be sure to check out Cafe Gitane's outdoor seating when the climate is right.

Tables at Cafe Gitane are available first-come, first-served, so be sure to show up a bit earlier on busy weekends. Cafe Gitane welcomes laid-back diners, so there's no pressure to throw on heels or a tie. A catering menu is also available if you're looking to dazzle the diners at your next shindig.

Bike parking is also available outside the restaurant.

A meal at Cafe Gitane will typically set you back about $30. Make sure to hit the ATM before heading to Cafe Gitane — it's strictly cash-only. You can stop by at almost any time, since Cafe Gitane offers breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

242 Mott St
New York,
NY
US

Meats are typically fired on a grill in customary Moroccan cuisine. But, despite an otherwise steadfast commitment to authentic, Moroccan food, Zerza owner Radouane ElJaouhari knows that, sometimes, a restaurant benefits from a little unconventional thinking. So when Zerza moved to a new location, ElJaouhari told his contractors to leave the existing clay oven in the kitchen. As a result, the distinctively Moroccan meats—ginger-marinated chicken-breast kebabs, spiced ground beef, lamb and chicken tagines—emerge juicier and with a more full-bodied flavor than their more “authentic” counterparts.

Though the cooking style may cross cultural boundaries, the ambiance at Zerza’s is positively Moroccan. Punctured-brass lanterns spray the walls with golden rays, casting gentle light on clay pots and guests nestled in chairs adorned with burgundy upholstery. On Saturday nights, belly dancers sashay to North African pop tunes or the rhythmic clatter of pots and pans.

308 East 6th Street
New York,
NY
US