Restaurants in Edgewater

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Despite being internationally renowned for his French-based haute cuisine, Jean-Georges Vongerichten swears his favorite food comes from the street carts of Thailand. The Alsace-born chef trained throughout France, but further honed his skills in Asia, slicing and dicing at luxury hotels in Bangkok, Singapore, and Hong Kong. He eventually crafted a signature French-fusion style, swapping out the heavy creams and stocks of traditional European cooking for the lighter juices, essences, and broths of Asian dishes. His inventiveness has launched a legendary career: he owns or collaborates on 35 restaurants around the world, has won two James Beard Awards, and was profiled on the Sundance Channel television show Iconoclasts. Described as the jewel of his empire, Jean-Georges’s eponymous restaurant glitters with the distinction of a four-star rating from the New York Times and three Michelin stars. Though it has risen to lofty ranks, the eatery stays grounded by shopping at local farmers’ markets for its seasonal menu. Dishes have included steamed flounder with roasted pumpkin seeds, spaghetti squash, and soy-yuzu broth, as well as Japanese snapper carpaccio with ginger, white radish, and olive oil. As the signature restaurant of the Trump International Hotel & Tower New York, Jean-Georges boasts a dining room with floor-to-ceiling windows that frame views of Central Park, Columbus Circle, and the city’s most affluent pigeons.

1 Central Park West
New York,
NY
US

The Magic Pot's menu combines international sauces and chocolates in delicious molten blends. Slices of apples and bread can be slam-dunked into cheesy appetizer dipping bowls, including the queso, a blend of cheddar and monterey jack melted in apple cider with fresh cilantro, roasted peppers, and sweet onions. Burbling like a magma flow, The Magic Pot's entrees overflow with savory bites of beef, teriyaki pork, and honey-garlic chicken to dip in sesame, teriyaki, and Asian-chili sauces. The Magic Pot's dippy desserts are made with Callebaut Belgian chocolate. All fondue desserts are served with fruit, brownies, marshmallows, and rice-krispies treats for dunking. Couples can customize a three-course Magic Feast and bring their own bottle or Stanley Cup full of wine to wash it all down.

934 River Rd
Edgewater,
NJ
US

After Ithaka’s seven-year stint as the best Greek restaurant in Greenwich Village according to Gayot, chef Harry Hatziparaskevas decided it was time for a change of scenery. Northeastward he went, to Ithaka’s current location on the Upper East Side. He brought with him the same authentic menu, which Time Out New York praises for offering “perfectly prepared traditional Greek dishes," such as moussaka, kapamas, and kalamari scharas—whole marinated squid charbroiled with lemon and olive oil. The new locale is roomy and rustic, with exposed ceiling beams, brick floors, and dreamlike paintings of Mediterranean destinations hanging from white, textured walls.

308 East 86th Street
New York,
NY
US

Rebecca's menu renders grumbling bellies speechless with steak- and seafood-based entrees served in softly lit rooms that "whisper romance" according to Susan Leigh Sherrill of Dining 201. The eatery's unique take on Cuban and Caribbean fare shines through in a grilled double-cut pork chop slathered like a love note to a scarecrow with roasted corn salsa. The espresso crème brûlée, a delicacy crafted from the chef's personal recipe, embellishes white linens indoors or tables strewn about the garden. Patrons swish their own libations while a cherubim fountain gurgles rock ballads to the surrounding flora-laced stone face.

236 River Rd
Edgewater,
NJ
US

####Luke's Lobster When Luke Holden encountered his first New York lobster roll, he couldn't believe his eyes. At around $20, it was over priced, drowning in mayo, and over-stuffed with celery––nothing like the seafood he had become accustomed to while growing up Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Luckily for New Yorkers, Luke was a life-long lobsterman and new exactly what he needed to do. He phoned his father, the owner of a seafood processing company, and together, they devised a plan. Thanks to longstanding relationships with Maine fisherman, Luke was able to arrange to have fresh lobster meat sent directly to him, steamed and sealed in air-tight packages just a few hours after being plucked from the ocean. Once the fresh catches arrive at Luke’s Lobster, Luke and his chef fold a full quarter-pound of the tender morsels into the toasted, Maine-style rolls that were lauded by The New Yorker. A tiny smear of mayo allows the lobster to shine through, enhanced simply with a light sprinkling of butter, lemon, and secret spices. Crab and shrimp rolls come similarly garnished, though the seafood is so fresh that Luke's even gives diners the option to skip all the extra stuff and let the meat stand on its own. Those who have extra room can sample New England Clam Chowder, made in Maine from the seafood processed at Luke's family's company or wash the briny goodness down with a Maine Root Soda, which offers up hints of blueberry, orange, ginger, and the rich, Maine soil from whence it sprang.

426 Amsterdam Avenue
New York,
NY
US

Marea Ristorante

Marea means “tide” in Italian, hinting at the restaurant’s concentration: seafood, especially seafood plucked from the four bodies of water that surround the bottom of the boot-shaped peninsula. The menu comes courtesy of chef and owner Michael White, who New York Times critic Sam Sifton lauded like so: “He cooks Italian food as if it were purely American: big and bold.” Though diners can select specific plates from the eatery’s extensive menu—fusilli with braised octopus, lobster ravioli, salt-baked Italian wild bass—the staff recommends the four-part, prix-fixe menu. This menu includes a crudo, ostriche, or antipasto; pasta; fish or meat; and a dessert, such as almond milk panna cotta with black mission fig or the semifreddo di niccola, with dark chocolate, piedmont hazelnut, and a partial serving of freddo. The highbrow reputation of Marea Ristorante’s cuisine is matched only by the restaurant’s atmosphere. The bar, backed by a rippled amber wall resembling underwater rock formations, competes for attention with white tablecloths that pop next to dark, wood-grained booths. Llittle touches add an extra-layer of refinement to the dining room, including silver-dipped conches and nautiluses that sit on the windowsills in shiny homage to the sea. It all adds up to an appealing eatery Zagat named New York City’s Best Italian Restaurant in 2012.

240 Central Park South
New York,
NY
US

Edgewater Scene