Museums in Edwards

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Reservations/Appointments: Optional

Established: 1963

Staff Size: 2?10 people

Average Duration of Services: 1?2 hours

Parking: Free street parking

Recommended Age Group: All Ages

Pro Tip: Your admission to the Holden/Marolt also gives you admission to Wheeler/Stallard Museum.

Most Popular Attraction/Offering: Wheeler/Stallard Museum

Q&A with the Marketing Director

When and how did you first develop a passion for your work?

The Aspen Historical Society is passionate about presenting Aspen's history. Our town's history is rich and colorful and we use a variety of tours and museum exhibits to tell the stories that make it up. Keeping the history going is integral to continuing to develop Aspen as a world-class place.

What special training do you or your staff have?

All of our guides and museum docents are NAI-trained and certified. NAI stands for the National Association for Interpretation. It's an extensive five-day program so that they are fully equipped in thematically designing tours and paying attention to guest's needs.

What is the experience customers can expect, and how do you make it special?

Each guest, or group of guests, is guided through the museum with their own docent. The experience is very intimate, and allows for a lot of dialogue and customization of tours.

620 W Bleeker St.
Aspen,
CO
US

Today, Breckenridge is a world-class ski town, complete with high-end shopping, vibrant nightlife, and outdoorsy splendor. But in 1859, it was just a shabby mining camp on the cusp of a gold-fueled population boom. Clearly, much has changed over the years. The nonprofit Breckenridge Heritage Alliance helps keep that history alive by preserving the town's historic sites and honoring the prominent people who helped shape the community. Thanks to the work of the alliance, visitors can pay a visit to the Victorian home once belonging to William H. Briggle, an early 20th century mayor, and his wife, the town's first Lady of Refinement. Or they can take a guided tour of the Washington gold and silver mine, one of the area's largest with more than 10,000 feet of underground workings. Similar exhibits explore the history of Summit County skiing, its pioneering railroads, and its haunted historic district, with tours available to suit all ages.

203 South Main St
Breckenridge,
CO
US

In a sense, the story of the three Golden History Museums sites goes back to 1938, when Golden citizens began collecting and exhibiting artifacts from the region's history. But in another sense, it goes back much further: the 18-inch stone walls of the Astor House were lain in the mid-19th century, and the Clear Creek History Park represents an immaculate recreation of pioneer-era Colorado. No matter how far back visitors are peering into the past, the museums flesh out the story of Golden from the time of horse-drawn wagons to today.

  • Size: it's a museum in three parts with more than 15,000 artifacts in the Golden History Center, the fully restored Astor House museum, and a reconstructed ranch at the Clear Creek History Park
  • Eye Catcher: the miniature town inside the Golden History Center
  • Permanent Mainstay: the photography collection (which can be browsed online) contains more than 2,500 historical images
  • Don't Miss: head down to the restored ranch to see events and demonstrations, a thriving beehive, heirloom-breed chickens, and one of the best skies in the country
822 12th St
Golden,
CO
US

Children run in trails marked by prehistoric footprints, and fingers run across fossils during each visit to Dinosaur Ridge, a nonprofit organization dedicated to the preservation of ancient artifacts. Around every corner of the outdoor museum—which rests on land designated as a national natural landmark—bones and impressions protrude from their earthy abodes as evidence of the area's once larger-than-life inhabitants. Paleontologists of all ages can examine curious tracks on surrounding hiking paths, such as Triceratops Trail, or hop on a guided bus tour to examine fossil sites and valleys where brontosauruses used to question the meaning of life.

Lurking inside the visitor center is the Trek Through Time exhibit, where interactive children's games, replica fossils, and massive murals join forces to lead explorers into different prehistoric eras. In addition to its day-to-day operations, Dinosaur Ridge also plays host to various events during the year, including Boy Scout days, birthday parties, and lectures that explain how T. rex stayed humble despite his large stature.

16831 W Alameda Pkwy
Morrison,
CO
US

Like a small-town railroad depot in the 1880s, the Colorado Railroad Museum’s main building features wide eaves and a bright-yellow exterior. The building reflects the Museum’s overall goal: to hark back to Colorado’s railroad era, a time when the state relied on its groundbreaking, narrow-gauge mountain railroads for supplies and information. Since 1959, the Museum has showcased the machinery of that time with an array of locomotives, passenger cars, freight cars, and cabooses. Alternatively, they present visitors with a glimpse of Table Mountain on the Museum’s train rides, enabling them to ride the rails in a bygone style without just taking the subway in an Abe Lincoln costume. To supplement its trains, the Museum hosts thousands of related rare photographs and artifacts, such as a replica of a 10,000-gallon water tank, humorously dubbed No Agua, that was once used to refill steam locomotives on the Chili Line to Santa Fe.

17155 W 44th Ave
Golden,
CO
US

Originally known as the Garden of Angels, Red Rocks enchants visitors with ethereal scenery and top-notch acoustics 6,450 feet above sea level. The amphitheater geologically emerged from the ocean floor over millions of years, its walls housing fossil fragments of various dinosaurs, including plesiosaurs, mosasaurs, and several plush Barney dolls. The carbon-dated rock 'n' roll history of Red Rocks includes performances by The Beatles, Jimi Hendrix, and The Grateful Dead, who kept coming back to the venue year after year in search of their missing flip-flops. The sonic stone architecture of the venue has also led to dozens of popular live recordings, including U2’s Live at Red Rocks: Under a Blood Red Sky, John Tesh’s Live at Red Rocks, and Neil Young’s Road Rock Vol. 1.

18300 W Alameda Pkwy
Morrison,
CO
US