Concerts in East Erie


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Harlem Globetrotters Playing Three-on-Five Since forming in the 1920s, the Harlem Globetrotters have continued to entertain millions of parents, children, and general basketball admirers with a trademark blend of athletic precision and razzle-dazzle showmanship. For the team's 2014 tour, a rotating [roster](http://gr.pn/PHdb6w) of Globetrotter favorites?including three female players?takes to the hardwood each game. Spectators might spot veteran guard [TNT](http://gr.pn/rOe0P4) sharing a behind-the-back pass with dunker [Quake](http://gr.pn/QTIGVh), whose high jump once cleared 7 feet, cruelly dashing his dreams of working in a ceiling-fan store. The Globetrotters might also present a study in contrasts with 5-foot-2 [Too Tall](http://gr.pn/PHdmPh) and 7-foot-4 [Stretch](http://gr.pn/1dYrbUt), the team?s tallest member. During each Globetrotters game, youngsters laugh along and witness the jovial jocks performing classic routines of unconventional passing and sudden transmutations of water into confetti. To infuse their visits with an extra shot of unpredictability, the Globetrotters also let fans in each city vote on special rules for every game; past rules have included the use of a four-point shot and the installation of a penalty box. Over the years, similar antics have followed the Globetrotters around the world, including to 122 countries and territories and all six continents on which basketballs grow naturally. The Globetrotters? extensive travels haven?t gone unnoticed: they?re one of the few teams to earn a spot in the Naismith Memorial Basketball Hall of Fame as ambassadors of the sport.
809 French St
Erie,
PA
US
The Grammy-winning trio Train freights a cargo of breezy melodies and poignant jams, satiating legions of fans on its 2011 tour. With intrinsically catchy beats and the crossover appeal of a bipartisan milkshake, Train's euphonic anthems bridge the gap between the hearts and brains of millions. Best known for Grammy-magnet singles such as “Hey, Soul Sister,” “Drops of Jupiter,” and “Calling All Angels,” Train’s grooves, combined with Patrick Monahan’s lilting vocals, stick in ears like relentless peanut butter, taking up brain space normally reserved for algebraic formulas and state capitols. During the gripping live show, devotees can expect sing-alongs from Train’s catalog of smashes, possibly sprinkled with cochleae candy from the band's upcoming album. Train even tickles diehard fans' other senses with its own brand of wine, Drops of Jupiter, fermented from astronauts' tears.
809 French St
Erie,
PA
US
One of many vaudeville and movie palaces that sprung up in the 1920s, the Warner Theatre today drops jaws in much the same way it did in its infancy: with glittering chandeliers, gilded ceilings, and red-felt seats. Yet before transforming into its modern incarnation, it served as a film-only venue with such luxuries as a rooftop garden and a ballroom in the basement. The Warner even had a dance troupe akin to the Rockettes?called the Roxyettes?who would high-kick before and after the screen lit up. After falling into disarray in the '70s, the Warner became a concert venue, saving it from the wrecking ball but forcing it to require a complete renovation in 1989 to remove years of grime and stray musical notes lodged between seat cushions. At the reopening gala, a host of stars performed, including Frank Sinatra in what would prove to be his last DC show.
811 State St
Erie,
PA
US
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