Things To Do In Espanola

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With four museums and six monuments, the nonprofit Museum of New Mexico Foundation keeps the state's artistic and cultural heritage alive with enthralling permanent collections, exhibits, and events. Art aficionados can marvel at more than 20,000 works by artists with strong ties to the state in the New Mexico Museum of Art, check out more than 1,300 artifacts in the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture, and attempt to tape their “lost cat” flyers to more than 100,000 items culled from 100 countries at the Museum of International Folk Art. Meanwhile, the New Mexico History Museum’s 30,000-square-foot exhibition space covers topics ranging from the Santa Fe Trail to World War II through art, maps, and photographs.

After each museum visit, guests can stop by the Coronado State Monument, which marks the spot where Coronado and his crew entered the Rio Grande Valley in search of the Seven Cities of Gold and their lost car keys. The foundation's sextet of monuments also includes the stone ruins of a 500-year-old Indian village at Jemez and exhibits on frontier and military life at Fort Selden.

238 Ledoux St
Taos,
NM
US

The blazing sunshine of summer and the snowy vistas of winter act as backdrops for New Mexico Adventure Co.’s range of outdoor entertainment. From June through September, summertime activities exercise adrenal glands with the thrills of ATV rides and whitewater rafting on the Rio Grande. Scenic jeep tours, horseback riding, and guided fly-fishing slow the tempo of these warm-weather pursuits and give guests a chance to drink in the scenery and nibble on the natural terrain. Come winter, equipment rentals take the fore, sending guests down mountainsides in goggles, skis, snowboards, and sleds. Year round, the adventure outfit’s eatery, Old Tymers Cafe, refuels patrons in between recreational pursuits with full breakfasts, pizzas, and Mexican eats.

220 Main Street
Red River,
NM
US

Ron and Olha Dolin didn’t discover their shared passion for wine and spirits until after they were married. Together they use Ron’s Ph.D. in engineering and Olha’s generational knowledge of producing vodka and brandy in Eastern Europe to craft handmade wines and fine spirits. Their wines include the specialty Emotion series, which includes cherry sherry, apple ice wine, and a wine made from rose petals. The two also distill spirits ranging from blue corn vodka and bourbon to gin made from New Mexico juniper, pinon, chamisa, sage, and rose hips.

18057 U.S. 84
Jaconita,
NM
US

Big River Raft Trips owner Billy Miller, who has more than 10,000 river miles logged on his personal odometer, leads a team of expert guides that steers full- and half-day rafting trips along the Rio Grande. Big River Raft Trips categorizes each tour by its difficulty, delivering aquatic thrills to paddlers of all skill levels through placid, sightseeing rides for beginners as well as heart-racing treks through Class IV+ rapids for experts and human-dinghy hybrids. All rafting equipment is included for all trip.

131 Paseo Del Pueblo Sur
Taos,
NM
US

The trained and certified naturalists at Wild Earth Llama Adventures guide adventurers of all ages and fitness levels across southern Rocky Mountain terrains with a team of amiable, sure-hooved llamas hauling their gear. Groups of 8–12 tour-goers and their noble beasts journey throughout the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the Rio Grande Gorge, soaking in breathtaking vistas of peaks, crystal-clear lakes, and lush forests.

P.O. Box 1298
Taos,
NM
US

A premier resort with 113 trails and a peak elevation of 12,481 feet, Taos Ski Valley was conceived at an even higher elevation: in the sky above the New Mexico peaks. While flying his Cessna 170 from Santa Fe Ski Basin to a Southern Colorado resort where he worked, Ernie Blake would scour the peaks for an area that could suit his dream of opening his own ski resort. He eventually found the right spot?a snow basin so perfectly formed that he at first thought it was an "optical illusion," he reported in Ski Pioneers?and, in 1955, he and his family began grooming the terrain that would eventually become a world-class resort.

With a base elevation of 9,207 feet, the resort makes it difficult for storm systems to pass by without dumping some fresh powder. The mountain records an annual snowfall of 305 inches without sacrificing consistently navigable conditions; the sun shines on the slopes more than 300 days each year. The slopes present skiable terrain for all levels, though they skew towards more experienced skiers, comprising 50% expert-level terrain and 50% suitable for beginners and intermediates.

In the summer, the melting snow gives way to a new landscape for outdoor recreation. The same slopes host heart-stopping mountain bike races, serviced by the lifts, as well as a disc-golf course. Scenic chairlift rides take guests gliding to the top of the mountain, where they can enjoy views of Wheeler Peak, West Basin Ridge, and the colorful blotches of wildflowers. Picnic tables await at the summit, providing a venue for alfresco dining or practicing Bigfoot calls.

116 Sutton Place
Taos Ski Valley,
NM
US