Museums in Etobicoke


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When George Gardiner began collecting ceramics in 1976, he was only interested in decorating his home. But soon his passion for pottery and porcelain grew, and, rather than build a second home entirely from teapots, he co-founded the Gardiner Museum in 1984 with his wife, Helen. Today, the museum's collection has ballooned to include more than 3,000 pieces, encompassing everything from Japanese sake pots and Canadian ceramic sculptures to Italian Renaissance maiolica plates. Objects from the core collection share space in the museum with special exhibitions. One of these is the annual 12 Trees of Christmas, a display of holiday trees. The museum supplements its showings with events such as lectures and ceramics-inspired meals, as well as clay classes for budding adult and child ceramicists. Visitors can even take home pieces from the Gardiner Shop, which sells Canadian ceramics, as well as international jewelry, scarves, and glasswork.
111 Queens Park
Toronto,
ON
CA
The sixth annual Wings & Wheels Heritage Festival celebrates the history of Canadian aviation with showcases, exhibits, and live demonstrations on the grounds of Downsview Park and Airport, Canada’s first urban national park. Tickets grant entrance to Hangar Bay 1's exhibitions and aircraft displays, access to outdoor display grounds and runways, free Canadian Air & Space Museum admission, and a tour of the newborn helicopter nursery. Wings events showcase classic aircraft from the world's oldest flying DHC-1 Chipmunk to brand-new cloud ticklers such as the gargantuan C-130J Super Hercules. In-between browsing fields of professionally manufactured and home-built aircraft, guests watch pilots fly swiftly into the airport compound.
35 Carl Hall Rd
Toronto,
ON
CA
A non-profit design centre and museum, Design Exchange educates guests in all realms of design with unique lectures, programs, exhibitions, tours of its historic building and collection, and youth activities. A family/dual membership grants pairs and families unlimited exhibition entrances, as well as free admission or discounts to lectures, movie nights, workshops, and gladiatorial paintbrush matches. Members may also enter a raffle drawing for two tickets to the November DX Awards, a celebration of excellence and creative mind bending in Canadian design. Membership also proffers discounts for children's enrolment in design camps and a 15 per cent discount off items from the DX Shop, a gallery of designer publications, apparel, household goods, and decor. Visitors may expect impromptu sightings of the industry's most creative and untamed minds, as well as peeks at upcoming design trends.
234 Bay St
Toronto,
ON
CA
The Hockey Hall of Fame chronicles the achievements of the sport’s greatest players. Located in Toronto, Ontario you’d be hard pressed to find a dedicated hockey fan who wouldn’t jump at the opportunity to pay them a visit. Established in 1943, the Hockey Hall of Fame is a treasure-trove of ice-hockey memorabilia. Notable items on display here include a host of NHL trophies, the Stanley Cup, and gear of some of the most prolific players in history. The Hall of Fame also recently started featuring cheerful interactive exhibits that allow children and adults alike to experience the excitement of hockey through both sight and sound.
30 Yonge St Bce Pl
Toronto,
ON
CA
The Royal Ontario Museum is among the world’s leading museums of natural history and world cultures. By combining universal cultures and natural history into one museum, the ROM aims to engage its audiences from across the globe in the relationship between nature and humanity. This fundamental link is explored through the museum's many collections and programs, offering a wide breadth of experience in both areas. 2014 also marks 100 years since the ROM's momentous opening, and the museum is planning a year-long anniversary celebration of both its legacy and its potential going forward. The ROM will kick off another century of lively, relevant content and programming to build a community among future generations of visitors who pass through its halls.
100 Queens Park
Toronto,
ON
CA
Although it memorializes the lives and exploits of countless Canadian pilots and engineers, The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum began as the dream of just four men. From a hanger at Hamilton Airport, friends Dennis Bradley and Alan Ness, along with their partners Peter Matthews and John Weir, set about preserving Canada's warplanes for the benefit of future generations. From the acquisition of their first Fairey Fireflies to the ambition rescue of an Avro Lancaster previous mounted for use as a statue, the collectors behind the museum painstakingly restored and recreated the planes that defended the nation and defined Canada's military aviation identity. Pilots welcome the public into the same Fairey Firefly and other vintage aircraft for special flights, but visitors don't need to leave the ground to peer into the cockpit of Canada's aviation history. The Canadian Warplane Heritage Museum's 108,000-square-foot hanger houses more than 40 historic aircraft, from biplanes such as a Fleet Finch to the nose of a Boeing 727. Viewing stands allow for up-close looks at many of theses aircraft, and visitors can even sit in the cockpit of a CF-100 when volunteers are on duty. The museum's value as a storehouse of history hasn't gone unnoticed; it's one of a handful of museums designated as a Cultural Property Institution by the Canadian government.
9280 Airport Rd.
Mount Hope,
ON
CA
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