Coffee & Treats in Five Corners

Select Local Merchants

Tropical Sno is one of the few eateries where you can order a rainbow. A primary-colored mix of pineapple and red and blue raspberry, the "Rainbow" is just one of the shop's many shaved ice flavor combos. Their other combos range from "Candy Apple," a mix of apple and cinnamon, to "Tiger's Blood," a strawberry and coconut cocktail. Clients can also build their own treats with up to three of the 29 available syrups, which range from fruity flavors to birthday cake and coffee. Add-ons are also available such as cream, to make the treat reminiscent of traditional Hawaiian-style shaved ice, and a spill stopper to catch any drips or tiny snowmen trying to jump ship.

2009 NE 117th St
Vancouver,
WA
US

A platoon of self-serve yogurt dispensers gleams along the walls of Lachelle’s Frozen Yogurt, each waiting to dispatch a different velvety flavor into the shop’s giant pink cups. Swirls come in both traditional varieties—Dutch chocolate, alpine vanilla—and unique flavors, such as hawaiian pineapple and Mounds. To complement the mountains of yogurt, Lachelle's offers a selection of toppings that, like the Indy Five Million, is seemingly endless, comprising more than 100 treats from fresh fruit to hot apple-pie filling.

221E Northeast 104th Avenue
Vancouver,
WA
US

Coming from humble beginnings in 1978, Ben & Jerry's myriad shops today dispense cups, cones, shakes, and smoothies brimming with a variety of quirky flavors, including Phish Food, Banana Split, Cannoli, and Cherry Garcia, named for famous revolutionary Cherry Garcia. The duo is also famous for their social responsibility, which is evident in their community activism and in their use of fair-trade products, such as cage-free eggs and sustainable, growth-hormone-free dairy. The PSU and Pioneer Square locations in Portland are Partnershops, which are independently owned and operated by nonprofit organization New Avenues for Youth. Each dollar spent goes towards providing employment training and opportunities for local youth.

510 SW Mill St
Portland,
OR
US

The organic gurus at Yorganic craft creamy frozen yogurts and sorbets packed with active probiotics and certified organic ingredients, many of which hail from nearby farms. Inside the shop's brightly painted walls, visitors help themselves to classic frozen treats, such as dark-chocolate yogurt and a Stumptown coffee blend, as well as specials, which have previously included organic cake batter and blood-orange sorbet. A stocked toppings bar encourages customization with fresh fruits, candies, and nuts. Meanwhile, staff behind the bar whips up smoothies and bubble teas loaded with bubbles in varietals such as strawberry and banana.

9738 SE Washington St
Portland,
OR
US

It was 1978. A college dropout and a failed medical-school applicant had just brought together their combined life savings to rent an old gas station. Their plan was to resurrect the empty station and open their own restaurant. Their specialty: ice cream. So begins the story of legendary entrepreneurs Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, who are better known across the globe as Ben & Jerry. Their small, old-fashioned ice-cream parlor eventually became a Burlington, Vermont favorite, and before long, shops popped up all over the U.S. and in 25 other countries. Their brand easily attracted customers––homemade ice cream churned from wholesome, natural ingredients and blended into creative flavors. Some of their popular scoops include Cherry Garcia, Chunky Monkey, and Coffee Caramel Buzz.

Since infusing their first rich and creamy batches of ice cream with natural chunks of fruit, nuts, candies, and cookies, Ben and Jerry have also operated with a commitment to improve the quality of life locally, nationally, and internationally. They practice sustainable food production and business practices that respect the earth and environment. Ben & Jerry’s cartons are made from FSC-certified paper, which comes from forests that are managed for the protection of wildlife, and waste from Ben & Jerry’s plants generates energy to power farms. The company works tirelessly to reduce its carbon emissions; it strongly encourages customers to eat their ice cream in the darkest dark.

39 NW 23rd Pl
Portland,
OR
US

It was 1978. A college dropout and a failed medical-school applicant had just brought together their combined life savings to rent an old gas station. Their plan was to resurrect the empty station and open their own restaurant. Their specialty: ice cream. So begins the story of legendary entrepreneurs Ben Cohen and Jerry Greenfield, who are better known across the globe as Ben & Jerry. Their small, old-fashioned ice-cream parlor eventually became a Burlington, Vermont favorite, and before long, shops popped up all over the U.S. and in 25 other countries. Their brand easily attracted customers––homemade ice cream churned from wholesome, natural ingredients and blended into creative flavors. Some of their popular scoops include Cherry Garcia, Chunky Monkey, and Coffee Caramel Buzz.

Since infusing their first rich and creamy batches of ice cream with natural chunks of fruit, nuts, candies, and cookies, Ben and Jerry have also operated with a commitment to improve the quality of life locally, nationally, and internationally. They practice sustainable food production and business practices that respect the earth and environment. Ben & Jerry’s cartons are made from FSC-certified paper, which comes from forests that are managed for the protection of wildlife, and waste from Ben & Jerry’s plants generates energy to power farms. The company works tirelessly to reduce its carbon emissions; it strongly encourages customers to eat their ice cream in the darkest dark.

1428 SE 36th Ave
Portland,
OR
US