Brazilian Restaurants in Forestville

Select Local Merchants

Chef Alcy De Souza named his restaurant after the Grammy Award-winning song that, in his words, “evokes beauty, elegance, and a dream.” At Grill from Ipanema, Chef Alcy is living his dream, which grew out a childhood spent helping his mother prepare meals for their family in Brazil. He wanted to bring the flavors of Brazil to the US and open a contemporary restaurant that stayed true to the history of Brazilian cuisine, which has roots in the indigenous people as well as immigrants from Africa, Europe and Asia. So for the past 20 years, he and his team have been serving authentic dishes from various regions of Brazil to hungry diners in the Adam’s Morgan neighborhood. Classic entrees include the Brazilian national dish, feijoada, a rich stew of black beans, dry beef, pork, sausage, and smoked meat served with collard greens and rice, as well as moqueca a baiana, a palm oil and coconut milk stew with cilantro, tomato, onion, scallions, green pepper, and a choice of fish. The drink menu also features authentic Brazilian creations, such as fruity cachacas and caipirinhas, as well as Brazilian beers and a soda featuring guarana berries, a fruit found only in the Amazon.

1858 Columbia Rd NW
Washington,
DC
US

Texas de Brazil blends the steak-centric cuisine of Texas with the traditional churrasco method of slow-roasting meat over an open flame grill to form a luscious meaty mélange. The full dinner ($39.99) marches out a cavalcade of choice cuts, allowing diners to welcome continuous windfalls of flavorful proteins. Brandish your table's provided card, green on one side, red on the other, and it will function as a meat traffic light that summons servers to either send stacks of seasoned beef, pork, or lamb skewers or halt plate traffic like a decorated culinary crossing guard. Or feel free to substitute greens for the grill by stepping into the sprawling salad-bar conga line ($24.99), two-stepping through toothsome goodies such as imported cheeses, steamed asparagus, and dozens of other hors d'oeuvres.

11750 Fair Oaks Mall
Fairfax,
VA
US

Within Bossa Bistro & Lounge’s dining room, organic cuisine and grass-fed beef embellish authentic Brazilian small plates. Soft lighting and music wash over diners as they swap bites of the mandioca frita’s crispy yucca fries and cilantro sauce for morsels of beef tenderloin, testing out their water wings in a kalamata olive sauce atop the Xadrezinho plate. Spinach collard greens and mozzarella flood mouths that bite into bolinho de arroz rice croquettes drizzled with marinara sauce. While patrons nosh, they clink mojito and caipirinha cocktails in celebration of first anniversaries or second successful interactions with curmudgeonly neighbors.

2463 18th St NW
Washington,
DC
US

Jordans 8's ingredient mixers grill hearty American favorites and roll an eclectic lineup of sushi. Flip through the grill menu to pinpoint an appetizer, such as the fried calamari, which sails to the gullet through a river of pineapple-coriander sauce on a hull of mixed greens ($8). Then elect an entree, such as the 14-ounce boneless rib-eye steak ($18), or one of 24 maki and nigiri sushi selections, one for every hour of sleep humans need in a week. The lava roll, one of many specialty rolls, juxtaposes shrimp tempura and shredded crab with aioli sauce ($11), and the roster of sushi and sashimi rolls amalgamate spices, vegetables, and raw fish ($9–$19), infusing the sushi menu with a wide range of flavors.

523 8th St SE
Washington,
DC
US

Franklin D. Roosevelt, Amelia Earhart, Robert Frost, and Calvin Coolidge were some of the first inhabitants of the walls of Occidental Grill & Seafood, where their autographed photos have since been joined by more than 1,500 statesmen, power brokers, and celebrities. Throughout the restaurant’s nearly 110 years in business, its various menus have served as a mirror to the major events of the 20th century, from the conserved portions that addressed the food shortage during World War I to the 1924 victory banquet for the World Series–winning Washington Senators. Today, following a massive renovation in its 100th year, executive chef Rodney Scruggs achieves the difficult task of paying homage to the past in forward-thinking dishes. Scruggs himself boasts quite the history in the culinary realm. His first job after studying culinary arts at Newbury College was—perhaps not so coincidentally—the Occidental, where he worked his way from a line cook to an executive sous chef. His career led him through some of the area’s most notable eateries before he returned to the Occidental, where he furthers simple combinations of fresh, local ingredients with refined touches and careful preparation. To wit, crispy soft-shell crab is accompanied by a sweat-pea puree, and roasted virginia rack of lamb hails from Border Springs Farm and sits beneath a coating of demi-glace. In addition to American craft beers and wines from around the globe, diners can honor the eatery’s legacy by sipping classic cocktails such as a rickey from Washington circa 1883 and a sidecar from 1920’s London. Surrounded by the aforementioned autographed photos, the main dining room exudes old-school elegance. From high, recessed ceilings, ornate bowl-shaped chandeliers dangle over white tablecloths in front of burgundy leather booths and windsor chairs. The wine room has a slightly darker décor, as the wine bottles lining the walls reflect the rich-chocolate color of high-backed leather chairs.

1475 Pennsylvania Ave NW
Washington,
DC
US

Nestled in the U Street Corridor and surrounded by restaurants that serve small plates, the owners of Lost Society prefer to think big with respect to both their eatery’s dishes and ambience. They commissioned Joseph Evans—formerly the executive chef of Smith & Wollensky’s DC location—to bring his expertise in creating a set of steak-centric menus that rely on local produce, dry-aged and certified-Angus beef, and regional seafood. To start, the richness of Wagyu beef carpaccio is cut by grapefruit and pea tendrils, and fried oysters get an upscale twist with a worcestershire beurre blanc and smoked maple hot sauce. Ten-ounce filets and 12-ounce sirloins come topped with herb butter, and blackened catfish is accentuated by a scallion cream sauce.

But the artfully plated dishes comprise only half the appeal that lures Lost Society’s trendy clientele. Design consultants Olvia Demetriou and Melinda Nettelbeck of hapstak demetriou + transformed the restaurant’s two stories into a space that balances modern elements with nods to the Victorian-era underground. The dining room lives on the first level, where studio lighting bounces off brocade banquettes, framed spy mirrors, and wallpaper patterned with the faces of ladies in elegant hats. Diners lounge on the purple and yellow couches lining exposed-brick walls before retreating upstairs to see the chandeliers hanging above the neutral-toned bar and roof deck. To seal in the supper-club experience, they sample signature cocktails—such as a lychee martini or jalapeno margarita—some of which are created by recipes that are more than 100 years old.

2001 14th St NW
Washington,
DC
US