Tours in Montgomery Plaza


Select Local Merchants

A native Fort Worthian with a degree in history from TCU, Segway Fort Worth's founder Daniel Dase, Jr. has always loved sharing his city?s cultural legacy?it?s just exponentially more fun to do so on an X2 Segway, the most advanced model on the market. With help from the deep treads on the machine's tires, each segway responds instantly to shifts in posture, moving organically and fluidly as groups flood city streets during segway tours. Before his groups of riders get gliding, his company's licensed operators conduct one-on-one tutorials to set all new riders at ease with their new moving platforms. And because Daniel corrals a fleet of these durable off-road models, his tours go places other segways can?t, be it the grassy knolls of the Fort Worth Botanic Garden or the slippery slopes of the neighborhood gym?s treadmills.
2901 W. 6th St.
Fort Worth,
TX
US
Strung along rustic stretches of backcountry roads on the western edge of the DFW metroplex, the Cross Timbers Wine Trails connect six local boutique wineries that feature complex handmade vintages and live music and theater events. Guests tour production facilities and sample wine at each estate, chatting with winemakers such as LightCatcher Winery's award-winning filmmaker-turned-vintner Caris Turpen, or Brushy Creek Vineyards' Les Constable, a former nuclear engineer. Each expert cultivates a memorable experience, plying visitors with delicate cheeses or fine wines made from High Plains Texas or California grapes. The landscape surrounding the wineries is as varied and intriguing as the fruits of the vine available for purchase or sample, with a breathtaking mixture of open prairie, brushy undergrowth, and thick woodland that gives the Cross Timbers region its name. As they trek across this idyllic landscape, travelers on the wine trail entertain themselves with events such as the relaxing groove of a jazz concert or the wine-fueled murder accusations of an interactive mystery theater.
1100 Foch Street
Fort Worth,
TX
US
The legend began in the 1880s, when Hezekiah Jones, the "Hangman," wandered through McDagenville with a bloodstained rope, attempting to cleanse the town of its evil. By his hands, more than 100 people died on the banks of the Trinity River before a lynch mob finally caught up to him. In their hysteria they strung him up to the limb of a rotted oak tree and left him to die. But in the morning, when they came to cut him down, only the frayed end of the rope was dangling from the bough. Now people say that the Hangman still wanders the night, clad in his black hood, searching for his next victim. Visitors to Hangman's House of Horrors keep an eye out for Jones as they creep up dimly lit stairways, dodge more than 100 souls lurking in the shadows, and seek his advice on tying a proper square knot. The scream center has been featured on the Travel Channel's list of scariest Halloween attractions and named one of north Texas's scariest haunted attractions by NBC 5. Apart from the legend, Hangman's House of Horrors’ success is due to the hard work of more than 1,000 annual volunteers who redesign more than half of the house to fit the yearly theme. Their combined efforts have entertained more than half a million patrons and raised more than $1.8 million for local charities, including the American Cancer Society, Wish with Wings, Cenikor, Rocky Top Therapy Center, and SafeHaven of Tarrant County.
2013 North Forest Park Boulevard
Fort Worth,
TX
US
Amon Carter Museum of American Art Since opening in 1961, the Amon Carter Museum of American Art has built up a world-class collection of more than 200,000 pieces, including 19th- and 20th-century canvases from Winslow Homer, Thomas Eakins, and Georgia O'Keeffe. Those masterworks share space with works by artists Frederic Remington and Charles M. Russell, among others, a collection of American photographs, and one of the country's earliest daguerreotypes. Special exhibitions delve more deeply into such styles as American modernism, abstract art, and landscape photography. The museum also strives to educate visitors through children's programs, book clubs, and lectures by artists and scholars on topics such as why it is unsafe to eat the fruit painted in still lifes.
3501 Camp Bowie Blvd
Fort Worth,
TX
US
The guides at Fort Worth Tours & Trails seek out storied locales and dish out historical secrets of Panther City through the outfit's assortment of tours via bus or by foot. For walking tours, groups gather at one of two locations: the east lawn of the Courthouse for the Hell's Half-Acre to Sundance Square tour or in front of the Visitors' Center on Exchange Avenue for the Stockyards and Historic North Side tour. The former stops at several spots that figured prominently in the downtown area's early development, while the latter combs the brick streets of the historic north side, home to the Cowboy Hall of Fame and the world's only longhorn herd that hasn't succumbed to Internet stardom as a dancing flash mob. On both excursions, tour-goers have the opportunity to hear a plethora of little-known facts and cocktail party-worthy anecdotes from the city's rich history.
100 West Weatherford Street
Fort Worth,
TX
US
This museum exhibits more than 4,000 artifacts that celebrate women’s contributions to the American West. Highlights of the collection include Annie Oakley’s gun and Dale Evans’s saddle, as well as a hall of fame honoring more than 750 history-making ladies.
1720 Gendy St
Fort Worth,
TX
US
Advertisement