Clubs in Georgia

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Horizon Theatre Company is one of Atlanta’s longest-running small theaters, with a devoted following of season ticketholders. Located in the heart of Little Five Points, it is convenient to several local restaurants like The Vortex, but if you skip dinner before the show you can always indulge in one of the theater’s giant cookie-dough cookies. This company is known for comedic favorites like The Waffle Palace and David Sedaris’ The Santaland Diaries; these productions return year after year and are always popular. The shows also include offerings for the younger set like Madeline’s Christmas, as well as more adult-focused works by local writers, like Third Country and The Book Club Play. Seating is general admission, with certain sections reserved for subscribers. But the Horizon Theatre Company is intimate enough that there really isn’t a bad spot in the house.

1083 Austin Ave NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

For the past two decades, Uptown Comedy Corner's small stage has hosted big acts such as Steve Harvey, Chris Rock, and Dave Chappelle, as well as weekly up-and-coming comedic talent. While watching performers' standup routines, guests can sip on cocktails and indulge in hearty American cuisine such as wings, half-pound hamburgers, and onion rings.

800 Marietta St NW
Atlanta,
GA
US

Flush with cash during the Roaring Twenties, Atlanta's Shriners set out to build a magnificent monument for their headquarters, dubbed the Yaarab Temple Shrine Mosque. The structure was to feature grandiose architectural touches such as towering minarets and onion domes. When a teetering economy threatened construction, the Shriners sold the building to film mogul William Fox, who finished the space as a movie palace with virtually no changes to its extravagant design. As splendid as the exterior was, audiences were unprepared for the interior. After seeing it for the first time, one Atlanta Journal reporter breathlessly remarked on the "picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur" on display.

Crafted to resemble the courtyard of a Moorish castle, the main hall's decorations begin in the back with a faux canopy of plaster and steel stretching over the rear balcony. Stone parapets wrap around the sides, culminating in a towering proscenium arch illuminated by hanging lanterns and overhung with persian rugs. Above, a blue ceiling sparkles with hundreds of recessed light bulbs, which refract through three-inch crystals. Projected clouds drift across this simulated starry night and rain on anyone who texts during a show.

The final jewel in the theater's gilded crown is the The Mighty Mo Organ. The second-largest theater organ in the world, the Mighty Mo was custom-built in 1929 for the princely sum of $42,000 to accompany any movie or live production. The instrument’s richly textured sounds erupt from 3,622 pipes of varying length, with the smallest no larger than a pen and the largest spanning five feet in diameter. Adding to the Mighty Mo's sonic tapestry is an internal glockenspiel, marimba, and xylophone, plus a system by which the stage's grand piano can be played remotely. The Mighty Mo also mimics thunder, steamboat whistles, saxophones, and its parents' voices when they're not around.

660 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

Flush with cash during the Roaring Twenties, Atlanta's Shriners set out to build a magnificent monument for their headquarters, dubbed the Yaarab Temple Shrine Mosque. The structure was to feature grandiose architectural touches such as towering minarets and onion domes. When a teetering economy threatened construction, the Shriners sold the building to film mogul William Fox, who finished the space as a movie palace with virtually no changes to its extravagant design. As splendid as the exterior was, audiences were unprepared for the interior. After seeing it for the first time, one Atlanta Journal reporter breathlessly remarked on the "picturesque and almost disturbing grandeur" on display.

Crafted to resemble the courtyard of a Moorish castle, the main hall's decorations begin in the back with a faux canopy of plaster and steel stretching over the rear balcony. Stone parapets wrap around the sides, culminating in a towering proscenium arch illuminated by hanging lanterns and overhung with persian rugs. Above, a blue ceiling sparkles with hundreds of recessed light bulbs, which refract through three-inch crystals. Projected clouds drift across this simulated starry night and rain on anyone who texts during a show.

The final jewel in the theater's gilded crown is the The Mighty Mo Organ. The second-largest theater organ in the world, the Mighty Mo was custom-built in 1929 for the princely sum of $42,000 to accompany any movie or live production. The instrument’s richly textured sounds erupt from 3,622 pipes of varying length, with the smallest no larger than a pen and the largest spanning five feet in diameter. Adding to the Mighty Mo's sonic tapestry is an internal glockenspiel, marimba, and xylophone, plus a system by which the stage's grand piano can be played remotely. The Mighty Mo also mimics thunder, steamboat whistles, saxophones, and its parents' voices when they're not around.

660 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta,
GA
US

No strangers to the stage themselves, the board of directors at The Velvet Note built the intimate venue as a musician?s dream of exquisite natural acoustics. On its carefully crafted soundstage sits a 1924 Baldwin Model M baby grand piano, which serves an endless lineup of locally and nationally renowned acts. In between applause and using their index fingers as maestro batons, visitors can occupy their hands with food from The Velvet Note?s menu, featuring lobster cobb salad, black mussels in garlic butter, and all manner of classic southern desserts. Run by musicians for musicians, the club creates an up-close-and-personal environment where performers and fans can actually mingle.

4075 Old Milton Pkwy.
Atlanta,
GA
US

A few finger-taps on the digital screens inside Ai Tunes Karaoke Lounge's private karaoke rooms unlock more than 70,000 songs in English, Korean, Cantonese, Mandarin, Taiwanese, Vietnamese, or Japanese for guest singers to choose from. Servers visit the rooms to take orders for tapas and entrees that range from Asian noodles to stone-baked naan wraps. They also pour draft beer and mix sake bombs or cocktails such as the French Connection—a smooth blend of Hennessy and Grand Marnier.

4771 Britt Rd
Norcross,
GA
US