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The Middle Fork of the Salmon River in central Idaho cuts through more than 100 miles of rugged wilderness, flowing past towering trees, wildflowers, and craggy mountains. Among rafters, it’s known as a Class IV river, with a few rapids reaching Class V level in high water. On this six-day whitewater-rafting trip from Adventure Guides, up to 24 adventurers take on the Middle Fork, spending their days alternating between rushing through roaring rapids and enjoying the scenery during calm stretches. Throughout the trip, rafters may have the opportunity to fly fish, hike, and soak in hot springs. Along the way, experienced crew members deftly navigate the waterway and handle all of the logistics to ensure a comfortable trip. For detailed information on the best way to reach Stanley, Idaho—the trip's launch point—visit the transportation page. Click here to see the full six-day itinerary.Before the trip: At 6 p.m. on the day before launching, crew members meet with guests for orientation in the conference room at the Mountain Village Lodge in Stanley, Idaho. Guides provide a detailed breakdown of the trip and hand out waterproof packs, day bags, and sleeping gear. Day 1: The group sets out from Stanley toward Boundary Creek or Indian Creek, depending on weather and water conditions. Before putting the rafts in the water, Adventure Guides and the U.S. Forest Service hold a safety briefing. The first day's ride is shallow and steep, and the group pauses for a break along the riverbank for lunch. That night—and each night for the rest of the trip—a supply boat runs ahead to set up camp for the evening. By the time the rafts arrive at the site, the crew will have already arranged everything you need, including the campfire, kitchen, tents, and s’mores tasting room. You can while away the evening by swimming, hiking, fishing, or playing games. Starting at 6 p.m., an hour of hors d'oeuvres and beverages is followed by a dinner that can include dutch-oven potatoes, baked salmon, stuffed chicken, or rib-eye steak. Fresh baked treats are on hand for dessert. Days 2–5: Each morning, guides start a campfire and set out a continental breakfast. About 8 a.m., they whip up a hot meal, often comprising potatoes, omelets, french toast, and pancakes. You can choose a vessel to ride in from a fleet of oar boats, paddleboats, and inflatable kayaks. Before and after lunch, the group negotiates rapids, hops overboard for the occasional dip in a swimming hole, and, of course, admires the views. The water is relatively calm on the second and third days, but picks up speed on days four through six. Lunch is included each day, and on the second and fourth nights you can take a refreshing sun shower. Day 6: After an early rise, the flotilla faces its biggest challenge: a stretch of whitewater known as "Impassable Canyon." After the confluence of the main branch of the Salmon, the boats cruise four more miles to the endpoint at Cache Bar. The crew packs up the boats and sets out a final lunch before guests board the bus back to Stanley. Read the Fine Print for important info on travel dates and other restrictions.

15 Spring View Ln
Great Falls,
MT
US

Red Apple’s founder Tammy Bennecke started her career in the classroom, helping six- and seven-year-olds tap into the wonders of the written word. “What I loved the most was watching that little light bulb go off in a first grader’s head,” she wrote in her blog last year, but she couldn’t help noticing a disturbing pattern as she began moving to older classrooms. It was clear that children who fell a few steps behind in earlier years were discouragingly unlikely to catch up, and might even be at greater risk of dropping out by the time they reached high school.

Undaunted, Bennecke left institutional education to combat adolescent illiteracy through Red Apple Reading, an online program of easily-digestible reading concepts that encourages interactivity and comes with trackable progress reports for parents and teachers. The system is designed to keep kids engaged and entertained: goofy animals and skateboarding kids parade across screens and flashcards, and reward points and bonus games provide a sense of accomplishment normally reserved for the one in 10,000 children who can successfully work the claw machine at the arcade.

26 West 6th Avenue
Helena,
MT
US

Publishing quarterly each year since 1951, the Montana Historical Society chronicles the state's place in the American West through its periodical Montana The Magazine of Western History. In each issue, writers dish on the discoveries and controversies that have molded the state, from developments affecting the state's many Native American people to the historical figures that have written its history. Maps, drawings, and old photographs accompany the words, offering an illustrated glimpse into the Montana of yesterday or even the day before. The efforts put forth by writers and photographers have won the magazine a multitude of awards over the decades, including seven Wrangler Awards for magazine nonfiction and ten Spur Awards from the Western Writers of America.

225 North Roberts Street
Helena,
MT
US