Clubs in Greenwich

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Japanese and Korean dishes share table space within Abis Japanese Traditional Cuisine, a Greenwich eatery in business for more than 20 years. Sushi chefs slice ocean-fresh seafood for sashimi and sushi platters, and hibachi chefs sear filet mignon, red snapper, and other proteins on tableside grills, pairing them with sides such as japanese fried onion soup. Korean specialties include bulgogi, seafood pancakes, and bibim bam served in heated stone bowls.

381 Greenwich Ave
Greenwich,
CT
US

The contemporary wood-paneled elegance of Butterfield 8's U-shaped leather booths and lamp-lit dining room complements the menu of urban American gastropub fare. Quash your hunger with the chipotle brisket nachos, bulging beneath the tasteful weight of pico de gallo, sour cream, guacamole, and chipotle pulled chicken ($12). Buttery mashed potatoes and crispy onions adorn the sauce-drizzled peppercorn skirt steak ($20), and the memphis pulled-pork sliders ($12) satiate mouths with bite-size morsels of flavor. Spread out in the spacious booths and imbibe the alchemical concoctions of specialty cocktails ($10) such as a dirty bleu martini, an ocean of Belvedere vodka bobbing with buoys of blue-cheese-stuffed olives, a drink as elegant as a chandelier in fur coat. Finish the feast with the chocolate-chip-cookie-dough smash, an iron skillet filled with half-baked cookie oozing beneath ice cream and chocolate sauce ($8).

112 Bedford St
Stamford,
CT
US

Writing in Time magazine, food critic Josh Ozersky praised the "Iberian flavors" of dishes prepared by Chef Anthony Goncalves, which he called "eclectic, unpredictable, and very, very good." The executive chef and co-owner of 42 the Restaurant, Goncalves sources ingredients from the surrounding Hudson Valley, then serves up his dynamic menu in the ultra-sleek dining room atop Westchester’s Ritz-Carlton. Sticky garlic lobster and crab and roasted pork tenderloin gleam on tables next to floor-to-ceiling windows, which let guests look out on White Plains, the sparkling Long Island Sound, and foolhardy merchant vessels sailing off the earth's edge.

1 Renaissance Sq Fl WHITE
White Plains,
NY
US

Hailed by none other than the New York Times for eclectic dishes that combine “a homey touch with a dash of originality,” The Pine Social throws a sophisticated spin on traditional American comfort fare. Chandeliers cast a soft glow on tables situated side by side within the tavern-like restaurant and lounge, which anchors its menu on free-range meats, ocean-fresh fish, and locally sourced produce. The kitchen’s homemade sausage and slow-braised beef short ribs are not to be missed, based on their own merits as well as their shared ability to whet palates for the dessert menu’s warm apple spring rolls. Sips of aged scotch and spiked, hot apple cider thaw jaws frozen agape at the tavern’s dark-stained walls, rustic wooden accents, and plush furnishings. Light from high-definition TVs glints off the bar’s full-service spirits station, beside which guests can treat their ears to music that pours forth from live bands on Thursday and Friday nights.

36 Pine St
New Canaan,
CT
US

Whether it's the family history, the spices, or the fresh ingredients that give Don Coqui's food its flavor, the results have the potential to dazzle the taste buds. Classic Puerto Rican dishes and American staples sit side-by-side on the expansive menu—though it's nothing compared to the wine list—with braised oxtail and plantain-crusted red snapper sailing to tables as swiftly as the rib and chicken combo and the porterhouse for two. Abuelita's tres leches cake and coconut flan with a deep caramel glaze add a hint of indulgence at the tail end of evenings, and wines from far-flung locales can be savored by the glass, bottle, or incredibly tiny spoon.

The Rodriguez culinary dynasty was born in the Bronx, where Jimmy Rodriguez, Sr. set up shop beneath a bridge and sold fresh seafood to passersby. Jimmy Rodriguez, Jr. took his father's love of food and doubled down, opening beloved restaurants across the city. Both his recipes and his passion inspired his children, who've turned that passion into the Don Coqui restaurants. Each aims to be a place where food, wine, and salsa dancing bring people together—something of a family tradition. It's like bowling on Christmas Eve, only better and with more paella. Their flavors have also made them a "Worth It" dining destination by the The New York Times.

115 Cedar St
New Rochelle,
NY
US

During Puerto Rico's long history, Spanish, Tainos, and African cultures have contributed to the country's culinary tradition, leaving behind cuisine defined by exotic spices and simple cooking styles such as braising and grilling. After visiting the island and sampling many dishes themselves, Siete Ocho Siete’s owners wanted to honor the tastes of the island’s globe-hopping flavors. At their restaurant, chefs designed menus that highlight Puerto Rico’s signature ingredients: the alcapurria’s taro root and plantains arrive stuffed with seasoned ground beef, and the chillo entero al volante presents a whole red snapper filled with fragrant coconut rice. Meals arrive in an interior shot through with festive decor: the walls are brightly painted, umbrellas peek out of frosty cocktails, and tables dress up in freshly pressed white cloths. On some nights, the lilt of live musicians regales diners with mid-meal music, and a wave room with bay views supplies a romantic setting for dates or mermaids catching a meal between shifts.

414 Pelham Rd
New Rochelle,
NY
US