Sightseeing in Hattiesburg

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Designed by celebrated architect Frank Gehry, the Ohr-O'Keefe Museum of Art exalts the work of George E. Ohr, a ceramic artist and moustache enthusiast known as the "Mad Potter of Biloxi." After it was destroyed in 2005 by Hurricane Katrina, the campus reopened in 2010 amidst a grove of ancient live-oak trees, featuring a series of six aesthetically impressive pavilions that include a welcome center, a gallery of African-American art, and an interpretive center inside a reconstruction of the house of emancipated craftsman Pleasant Reed. Current exhibitions include collections from some of the art world's biggest names, including Andy Warhol and ceramic sculptor Jun Kaneko, as well as selections from Ohr's Gulf Coast collection, which inspired the American Modernist movement and several MLB baseball teams to wear ceramic pots instead of baseball hats.

386 Beach Blvd
Biloxi,
MS
US

As the Jackson Convention and Visitor’s Bureau’s reigning Travel Attraction of The Year, as well as the subject of accolades from the Jackson Free Press and Parents & Kids Magazine, the Mississippi Museum of Natural Science delights and enlightens attendees of all ages. A family membership grants two adults all the benefits of joining, including one year of free admission and a 10% discount at the museum gift shop. Parents may extend their membership to include any number of offspring under the age of 18; grandparents, aunts and uncles, and other guardians may include up to four children; lonely puppet-makers may not include any wooden wards they’ve wished to life.

2148 Riverside Dr
Jackson,
MS
US

Winner of the 2010 Medal for Museum and Library Service, the beautiful, newly-renovated Mississippi Museum of Art is home to a diverse and rapidly-expanding permanent collection, including American art, British 19th century portraits, Pre-Columbian ceramics, and more. Feast your eyes upon the museum's current exhibitions, including River and Reverie: Paintings of the Mississippi by Rolland Golden, the Mississippi Watercolor Society's Grand National Watercolor Exhibition, and Oraien Catledge: Photographs of Cabbagetown. Refuel your art-engines mid-visit with a hot lunch at The Palette Café by Viking. Using fresh, local ingredients, executive chef Emily Hine Burgess dishes out Southern-style meals influenced by the tastes and patterns of the museum's Mississippi home.

201 E Pascagoula St
Jackson,
MS
US

The USS Alabama spent 37 months in active duty during World War II. It earned nine battle stars and never suffered significant damage from enemy fire. Following this illustrious military career, the battleship was set to be scrapped because of the prohibitive cost of maintaining a wartime fleet. But in 1964, Alabama schoolchildren put forth a fierce fundraising campaign and raised $100,000 to save the ship. Their efforts inspired a corporate sponsor to supply the $1 million balance, and the navy donated the ship. And so the USS Alabama Battleship Memorial Park was born.

Today, the ship rests safe and sound in the harbor—a 680-foot mammoth whose enormous mass displaces more than 44,500 tons of water. More than 13 million visitors have trod its deck, wandered through its passages, and gazed at its 29 16-inch and .38-caliber guns.

Resting alongside the ship, the WWII submarine USS Drum welcomes visitors to explore inside its labyrinthine hull, inviting them to climb through hatches and imagine what life would be like if every doorway were round. The memorial park also houses a cavalcade of military equipment, vehicles, and aircraft on display, including a T-55 Iraqi tank, a Cold War–era Lockheed A-12 Blackbird, and a World War II–era Douglas C-47D Skytrain.

2703 Battleship Pkwy
Mobile,
AL
US

The five flags in front of the Condé-Charlotte Museum House represent Mobile’s tumultuous history under the rule of five countries: France, Spain, Britain, the United States, and the Confederate States. Within the house, visitors can see antique furnishing that correspond to each of these periods in time, with a different theme in each room—for example, the British room holds antiques from 1763–1780, when the British occupied the city. The National Society of the Colonial Dames of America in Alabama run the house and operate its tours, which traverse both inside and the outdoor, Spanish-themed garden.

104 Theatre St
Mobile,
AL
US

Built in 1857, the Southern Market/Old City Hall building served as home to three groups: the mayor and his city council meetings, several local militias, and a food market. Since then, the Italianate building has been deemed a national landmark, and its tenants have been whittled down to one: History Museum of Mobile. With its permanent exhibitions, the museum preserves more than 300 years of Mobile history, starting with the city's first Native American inhabitants. Interactive exhibits and artifacts—including antique silver and a cannon recovered from the CSS Alabama, which sunk during an 1864 battle—usher guests all the way to the present day.

Along with its mainstay exhibitions, the museum hosts events dedicated to film screenings, lectures, and debunking myths purported by Magic 8 Balls. History Museum of Mobile team has also helped open two other historical sites in town, including the Phoenix Fire Museum, which houses horse-drawn steam engines.

111 S Royal St
Mobile,
AL
US