Movies in Hoboken

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Originally called the Austin, this vintage 1930s theater has seen several ups and downs in its history, from years as a second-run double-feature house to a red-tinted stint that got it shut down by the city. In its current incarnation, the Kew Gardens Cinemas flaunts restored art-deco flair alongside modern projectors and molar-rocking surround sound. Stadium seating and a fully stocked concession stand further complement current flicks by granting every set of eyes a great view and every set of dental braces something to hold during scary scenes. Swing by the theater with a friend to snack on your own small popcorns (a $5 value each) and sip sodas (a $3.50 value each) while enjoying a vintage movie-viewing experience that beats watching Betamax tapes on your Great Uncle Vinnie's 1978 Zenith.

8105 Lefferts Blvd
Kew Gardens,
NY
US

Today's Groupon side deal has the answer to your musings about what to do this Halloween (and no, it isn’t covering your boss's hybrid SUV in extra chunky peanut butter). With today's deal, $14 gets you into the monster mash of the year: the Halloween Extravaganza at BLVD, a $28 value. Get decked out in the clothes you've wanted to wear all year but would normally get you arrested, get your fake-blood-splattered friends to help your real-blood-splattered friends to the hospital, then head out for a night of music and mayhem.

1633 Broadway
New York,
New York
US

Abbey Theatre veteran Ray Yeates takes audiences on a guided tour of the Irish émigré’s psyche with an uplifting one-man performance set amid the Irish economy's stunning collapse. In this standalone sequel to his internationally produced In High Germany, acclaimed playwright Dermot Bolger reconnects audiences with Eoin, an expat back in the country of his birth after an extended stay in Germany. Armed with no more than his sharp wits and the stitching on his polo shirt, Ray Yeates convincingly transforms the intimate West Village stage into Dublin Airport for a riveting 75-minute performance. Making use of airports’ birthday-clown-like tendency to evoke existential dread, the play extracts an uplifting story of friendship and family from the midst of a late-night boarding area.

27 Barrow St
New York,
NY
US

Deemed one of the year's 25 film festivals worth its entry fee, ACEFEST received more than 1,000 submissions from all over the country for 2010, and the final lineup screens a smattering of features, shorts, documentaries, animated films, and more. ACEFEST co-founders Tom O'Malley, Luke Szczygielski, and Don Lavis are college pals and cinephiles who realized that their film professors were ignoring contemporary American crème de la crème; ACEFEST corrects this imbalance with a multi-day dose of prized domestic oeuvres. Celebrate the festival's kick-off with entry to the opening-night after-party, where you can mingle with industry up-and-comers and NYC filmgoer fixtures.

54 Varick Street
New York,
NY
US

Based in the West Village, Film Forum is an autonomous non-profit cinema house that has the wonderful distinction of being open for more than four decades. The theater’s three screens run a variety of American independent features and foreign art films every day of the year, and curates in-house film festivals, documentary showings and retrospectives as well. These special events often bring writers, directors, filmmakers and authors to the stage for lectures and Q & A sessions, which can render the fewer than 200-seat spaces a bit cramped at times. But for the cinematically passionate, Film Forum remains a mecca of quality film screenings and rare archival showings, all run by a core group of buffs and hobbyists who truly enjoy the work they do.

209 W Houston St
New York,
NY
US

Located in a former fire station, this cinema in Greenwich Village is the neighborhood’s longest running. Since 1963, Cinema Village has survived on a steady diet of art-house and indie programming, which has included documentaries, animation, cult classics, foreign films and festival screenings. Now decked out for the digital era, the three screens continue to play to audiences of up to 156 inside the tight, spartan theaters. But the lack of creature comforts matters little to the dedicated patrons who come for the shows they can’t get anywhere else in the city. And should you arrive too early to grab a seat, waiting space is always available in the small, dim downstairs lounge.

22 E 12th St
New York,
NY
US