Galleries in Crosstimbers

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Staring at a blank piece of paper can be intimidating, but browsing the more than 100 pieces of blank, premade pottery at Young at Art draws hibernating creativity from its den, enticing the brain with shape, size, and bisque meat. Pieces range between $6 and $60, and the price of pottery covers everything required to design and fire a project, including time. Grab a blank plate and paint a meal upon it, stencil a cup with springtime flowers, or decorate a picture frame worthy of being hung inside itself. Laura, the studio's friendly ceramics guru, will happily move creative blocks with helpful suggestions, pointing you to the store's volumes of sample books, stencils, and templates for further inspiration. Upon painting the piece, you'll leave it with Young at Art for glazing and firing—four to seven days later, your triumphant claychievement will be available for pickup, prepared for its dazzling debut in an adobe dining room or as a thoughtful gift for a clay pigeon. Your Groupon is also good for Young at Art's glass-fusing process ($10+ per piece), where you can melt vivid designs into pre-cut ornaments and charms; its "Paint Me" process ($18–$24), where painted designs are pressed onto T-shirts; or clay prints (pricing varies), with fingers and toes granted immortality through the burn of the kiln. No additional studio sitting fees apply.

244 W 19th St
Houston,
TX
US

Twenty seconds of laughter gives the heart the same workout as three minutes of hard rowing. Today’s Groupon gets you all the benefits of a bumps race without pelting you with verbal harassment through the Cox Box. For $10, you’ll get two tickets to a Friday Night Family Improv show at Third Coast Theater, a $20 value. (Note: Value applies to regular adult tickets only; student and child tickets are regularly $5.)To avoid this common improv pitfall, print out this handy list of suggestions by clicking Print, located under the File menu in most browsers.

2317 W 34th St
Houston,
TX
US

The 14-acre Bayou Bend estate, the former abode of philanthropist and informal First Lady of Texas Ima Hogg, was finished in 1928 and donated to Houston's Museum of Fine Arts by 1957. Hogg then transformed her mansion into a de facto museum, accumulating one of the largest collections of American decorative art in the world. The nearly 5,000 masterly pieces range from furniture to ceramics, and in age from Colonial America all the way to the end the Civil War.

6003 Memorial Drive
Houston,
TX
US

It might seem strange to see a Gutenberg Bible page pulled using mid-1400s technology, or the Declaration of Independence being printed on an authentic 19th-century iron hand-press. At The Museum of Printing History, where local artists give live demonstrations of real, working artifacts, these sights are almost commonplace. In its mission to preserve and share the history of written communication, the organization functions as part museum and part interactive classroom. A permanent collection highlights preserved prints and gear from around the world—from ancient Mesopotamian clay tablets to Civil War-era newspapers. This collection even includes a display of equipment and documents belonging to Texas' first printer.

However, the museum's four galleries and 14,000 square feet of space aren't just reserved for relics. Every year, staff curate 12 rotating exhibits that, in the past, have covered the work of contemporary printmakers and photographers or explored the evolution of modern printing around the world. Meanwhile, an on-site print shop holds hands-on, all-ages workshops in typography, paper-making, and other forms of print-based art.

1324 W Clay St
Houston,
TX
US

Today’s Groupon offers an upgrade from your biography audio books. For $20, you’ll experience legendary lyricist Stephen Sondheim’s candid confessions at The Society for the Performing Arts on Sunday, October 25, a $42 value. New York Times columnist and former chief drama critic Frank Rich will prompt the esteemed composer to reflect on his career, collaborations, and creative process during the 7:30 p.m. performance at Jones Hall. Gypsies: “Boy, I was pretty sure I was going to get sued for this one. To make the lawyers happy, I added a scene where giant robots fight each other and changed that song to ‘Everything’s Coming Up Robots’.” A Different West Side Story: “You can’t copyright a part of town! The story is basically the same as the regular West Side Story, but some of the characters in mine are giant robots who have forbidden love.” Sweeney Ted: “I didn’t change much in this case because the original seems to also be about robots. A huge hit!”

615 Moss Bluff Drive
Moss Bluff,
LA
US

Art can foster a sense of community and inspire social change. It is this belief that drives artists Reginald and Rhonda Adams, who founded Museum of Cultural Arts, Houston in 1999 when they noticed a lack of community participation in the arts. Using their vibrant center as a springboard, the couple and their staff have brought art programs to more than 30 public schools and 15,000 underserved youth, helping the youngsters unleash their innate creativity and heighten their social awareness. Within the museum, rotating exhibits, such as May’s Queens of Creativity Mother Earth Exhibition, carry pertinent social messages such as the importance of calling Earth’s core on Mother’s Day. Community projects such as a recent mural painting for a school and collaborations with the Leukemia & Lymphoma Society help carry out the museum’s mission as a vehicle for expression.

908 Wood St
Houston,
TX
US