Catering in Gulfton

Select Local Merchants

Tell us about your business.

My business is a catering and carry-out food business. Just think of it as a place where you can not only buy lunch on the run, but if you don't want to cook dinner, come and pick out some goodies for that meal, also. [It's] family run and local [with] organic salads, entrees and a lot of different sides.

How would you classify your cuisine?

Healthy homestyle with a twist!

How would you describe the ambiance of your business?

Large, working open kitchen! You can watch us create great-tasting food while you eat one of our award-winning chicken-salad sandwiches.

6600 S Rice Ave
Bellaire,
TX
US

Weddings, bar mitzvahs, sweet 16s, and holiday parties held at Demers Banquet Hall can't help but give off an upscale vibe. The venue's three event spaces feature luxurious touches such as crystal chandeliers and extra-large dance floors. To keep event-planning easy, the facility also features in-house catering and lighting services.

8225 Cantrell St
Houston,
TX
US

If anyone was ever born to pickle corned beef, it was Ziggy Gruber. His grandfather, Max, opened the famous Rialto deli in New York City in 1927, the first in a long line of revered eateries that would include Berger's on 47th, Wally's Downtown, and the Griddle on 16th. It was in one of many family delis that Max first learned to pickle, cure, and smoke meat and to bake classic Eastern European pastries such as sour cream, raisin, and nut rugglach and russian chocolate bobka. But while blintzes and lox were in Ziggy's blood, he longed to take them further. "This is my calling," he told Guy Fieri on Diners, Drive-Ins, and Dives, "To elevate Eastern European Jewish food." So he went overseas and enrolled in the Cordon Bleu Academy in London, where he spent the next two years working in three-star Michelin restaurants and cooking for heads of state, including the Queen. After graduating and returning to the states, he found himself cooking for another kind of royalty—he open Ziggy G's on LA's Sunset Boulevard, where celebrities such as Johnny Depp, Dennis Hopper, and Leonardo DiCaprio were known to drop in for a nosh or to prepare for an upcoming role as a noodle kugel. It was in 1999 that Ziggy partnered with experienced restaurant man Kenny Friedman to bring traditional Jewish food to an unlikely place: Houston. As a result, Texans can dig into Reuben sandwiches, kippers and eggs, potato pancakes, egg creams, and bowls of homemade matzo-ball soup that rival anything being served in Manhattan. To make the experience as authentic as possible, Ziggy has even adorned his menu with a "deli dictionary" of common Yiddish phrases to help his guests feel like mishpuchah (family). He's also kept Texas-sized appetites in mind––the eight-decker Zellagabetsky sandwich comes loaded with corned beef, pastrami, turkey, roast beef, salami, tongue, and swiss cheese on rye, and is so large that anyone able to finish it by themselves receives a slice of Ziggy's famous cheesecake on the house.

2327 Post Oak Blvd
Houston,
TX
US

Houston Press named Molina's Cantina Houston's Best Tex-Mex Restaurant in 2009 and Texas Monthly put it in its Yellow Cheese Hall of Fame, and Men's Health named the chili con carne with cheese enchiladas one of America's greatest guy foods. Yelpers give the Westheimer Road location a 3.5-star average, and the Washington Avenue location an average of three stars. While some reviewers have mixed opinions of the food at the Westheimer Road location, most love the chili con queso.

3737 Crossview Dr
Houston,
TX
US

Lauded as Houston’s ultimate kolache destination, Olde Towne Kolaches & Bakery offers Texans an extensive menu of traditional Czech baked goods and fresh, made-from-scratch doughy desserts. The kolache, which first arrived in the U.S. after Lady Liberty implored Europe to send its tired, hungry masses and two centuries’ worth of its most beloved desserts, is a hand-baked pastry filled with sweet or savory ingredients. Unlike Americanized versions of the pastry, which are often loaded with tiny cherry pies and M-80s, Olde Towne’s selection stays true to the treat’s Czech roots, so you can grab a sausage and cheese ($1.75/$18.95 dozen) or a Texified ranchero ham, egg, and cheese ($2.10/$22.75 dozen) kolache for non-dessert noshing. Fruit-laden varieties ($1.05/$12 dozen) include apple, blueberry, raspberry, and more, while veggie options, such as the spinach, egg, and cheese ($1.85/$19.95 dozen), offer pastried protein without the risk of involuntary invisibility associated with perfectly cooked meat. Cinnamon rolls ($2/$22 dozen) and muffins ($1.55/$16.75 dozen) are also available, as are individual sweets and hot, fresh coffee.

8821 Westheimer Rd
Houston,
TX
US

Divined by Chef Emilio Chavez, Decco Café's modern American breakfast and lunch menus surge with classic dishes prepared with deliciously artful twists. The day's inaugural meal can be coroneted with an egg-centric dish, such as the huevos rancheros ($9), or a pro-fruit and nut candidate, the banana macadamia pancakes with orange butter ($7). Fighting off troublesome social constructs like "salad" and "sandwich," the lemon-tarragon chicken-salad sandwich ($10) embraces its true nature and satisfies supporters of both camps. Blooming with crabmeat in an orange sauce reduction, the portobello mushrooms ($12) have been rumored to thrill lunchers with dynamic flavors and a streamlined shape, a must-have for unexpected food fights.

5120 Woodway Dr
Houston,
TX
US