Sightseeing in Huntington

Select Local Merchants

Crestwoods Frame Shop and Gallery protects clients' cherished paintings and possessions and displays work from celebrated local and regional artists. The studio boasts more than 2,500 types of frames, paired with acid-free archival materials and UV glass to reduce fading. The staff also restores old photographs and provides crisp, professional digital printing services.

314 N Main St
Roanoke,
IN
US

Madeleines Bakehouse takes its inspiration from the French treat known as a madeleine—a shell-shaped cake with a buttery crust and sponge-like texture. Originating in the city of Commercy in the 18th century, madeleines earned their name when a girl named Madeleine baked a batch that made it to the mouth of Louis XV's wife, who shared them with a loveable stray who would later win the world's heart by starring in Homeward Bound. This deal gets you a dozen of these majestic pastries, superb for dunking into an afternoon tea or submerging into your backyard pool of chocolate. Madeleines Bakehouse uses local and organic eggs in all of its recipes—including banana bread, coffee cake, and chocolate bouchon—ensuring high levels of vitamins and a soft richness.

302 E Berry St
Fort Wayne,
IN
US

Opened in February of 2000, the African/African-American Historical Museum aims to educate and promote understanding of the African Diaspora and its impact on American history and culture. Spanning two floors of the historic John Dixie building, the museum chronicles African-American progress from the early days of slavery to the continuing milestones of today. Along the way, all ages, colors, creeds, and extraterrestrial tourists will be treated to fascinating stories of the Underground Railroad, important inventors, civil rights activists, and local pioneers such as William E. Warfield, who published the first black newspaper in the area called the Fort Wayne Weekly Vindicator. Even more priceless are Warfield's voluminous diaries, which detail daily events in Fort Wayne from 1909 through 1936. Meanwhile, the sports archive on the second floor is designed with a miniature football field and basketball court, with pictures, artifacts, and trophies of local sports legends.

436 E Douglas Ave
Fort Wayne,
IN
US

Between the stately walls of engine house #3, generations of firefighters stood guard around the clock from 1893 to 1972. Currently, the museum hosts exhibits, artifacts, and a fire-safety learning center. The garage has a variety of classic fire trucks, including the 1848 Button Hand Pumper, which served loyally for the better part of four decades, and the 1942 International Engine, which has been beautifully restored for parades and occasional Slip 'n Slide parties. Aside from gazing at the old-fangled firefighter tools of yesteryear and gleaning historical nuggets, you and your guests will also gather tips and tricks for preventing fires, controlling fires, fighting fires, and helping fires with marital problems.

226 W Washington Blvd
Fort Wayne,
IN
US

Artlink, a non-profit, independent visual-arts gallery, showcases artwork from both emerging and established artists. Unlike many other Indiana galleries, it's not associated with any university or artist co-op, preferring to roam freely through the forest of artistic expression, harvesting the heartiest redwoods and capturing the most exotic birds. With an individual membership ($20), you'll get unlimited access to the gallery’s 16 annual exhibits. Currently on display, The Member’s Show features the work of Artlink members, and the Landscapes: Urban and Rural exhibit that opens August 20 will display pictures of area landscaping companies in action, shaping hedges, mowing grass, and winning the hearts of mail carriers.

437 E Berry St
Fort Wayne,
IN
US

At Northside Galleries, $90 worth of services goes a long way, approximately furnishing a black-framed single mat for an 11”x14” diploma ($95), a single floated mat and mounting for a framed 10”x12” piece of art ($89), or a double-matted glossy 8”x10” ($99) for a portrait of a cow balancing a papaya on its nose. Northside has more framing options than even Teddy Roosevelt can shake a stick at, though 30 framing profiles are handy for quick project solutions. Standard and acid-free mountings are available, along with stretching for jerseys and glass with reflection control and UV reduction. Frames range from plain to museum quality in a variety of styles ($3.50/foot to $70/foot), so take your time while perusing the chevrons of potential style.

335 E State Blvd
Fort Wayne,
IN
US